Why we still need to talk about boards

15 May 2019

NHS Providers has published an update to its 2015 briefing We need to talk about boards, to reflect the changing context within which provider boards are operating as we seek to embed collaborative working in local health and care systems.

We still need to talk about boards reflects on changes in the health policy environment including the NHS long term plan, with its evolution of integrated care systems (ICSs) and the renewed focus on collaboration over competition.

Board leadership, and sound local accountability, are critical in managing risk and delivering high-quality care, so must remain a key component of system working now and in the future.

Miriam Deakin    Director of Policy and Strategy

We set out why provider boards, working closely with local partners, will play a key role in delivering the plan’s ambitions.  Board leadership, and sound local accountability, are critical in managing risk and delivering high-quality care, so must remain a key component of system working now and in the future.

This revised version reiterates the value of this leadership by a unitary board within the wider system context. 

 

The director of policy and strategy at NHS Providers, Miriam Deakin said:

“The delivery of high-quality healthcare involves a degree of risk which is why good governance is vital in health and care, as in many other safety-critical industries.

“However, the changing landscape of health and care delivery and the move to joined-up working can understandably throw up unanswered questions for trust boards. In this updated briefing we hope to highlight some of these, and offer our view of the value of the unitary trust board within a system context.

In this updated briefing we hope to highlight some of these, and offer our view of the value of the unitary trust board within a system context.

Miriam Deakin    Director of Policy and Strategy

“Collaboration between the different organisations in local health and care systems offers the potential to help integrate services for local populations, and make best use of limited, collective resources.  But this does not dilute the value of good governance and accountability in individual organisations.  For trusts that means a strong unitary board able to look outwards and work with others, whilst maintaining a core focus on the quality of care for patients and service users.”

 

Read an accompanying article from John Coutts, policy advisor for NHS Providers.

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