Funding must reach front line for suicide prevention strategy to succeed

16 March 2017

The health select committee in its final report on suicide prevention has said that the prevention strategy needs a greater focus on implementation.

It also highlights the workforce shortfall as a key barrier to successful implementation of the prevention strategy.

Commenting on the report, the director of strategy and policy at NHS Providers, Saffron Cordery said:

“NHS Providers welcomes the final report of the health select committee’s inquiry into suicide prevention, published today, which clearly identifies areas that must be addressed if the government is to achieve its ambition to reduce suicides by ten per cent.

A clear outline of how the government intends to make this funding secure against a tough backdrop of public health and community care cuts is needed.

“The committee is clear that unless dedicated funding reaches the front line, it risks being “too little too late” to successfully deliver this strategy. It is the responsibility of both government and commissioners to ensure this money reaches the right initiatives aimed at preventing suicide within the most vulnerable groups.

“A clear outline of how the government intends to make this funding secure against a tough backdrop of public health and community care cuts is needed. 

“Without appropriate funding, mental health service providers will struggle to recruit the staff needed to deliver the measures outlined including provision for those who attend A&E for self-harm injuries, home treatment and follow up within three days of discharge.

“As focus turns to implementation, it will be important to scrutinise local prevention plans to ensure they can be rolled out effectively with a joined up approach between providers, local authorities and the voluntary sector.”

 

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