Trusts are doing level best in extremely difficult circumstances

17 October 2017

 

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has published its 2016 emergency department survey, which surveys more than 45,000 people who received urgent and emergency services provided by 137 NHS trusts across England.

Of respondents who had attended a Type 1 department:

However, over a quarter (29%) of those people who had requested pain relief medication said that they waited over 15 minutes before they received it and 7% said they did not receive any at all.

 

Responding to the findings, the head of policy at NHS Providers, Amber Jabbal, said:

“This survey provides further evidence of the skills and commitment shown by frontline NHS staff in providing urgent and emergency services, often in extremely difficult circumstances.

“The CQC is right to say they should be proud of their achievements.

Despite the relentless rise in demand and gaps in staffing, a large majority of patients were positive about their experience.

“Despite the relentless rise in demand and gaps in staffing, a large majority of patients were positive about their experience.

“But the findings also suggest the growing pressures may – at times – affect the quality of care.

“It is vital that staff are able to take time to discuss treatment, offer adequate pain relief, and ensure that patients have the information they need after they have been discharged.

“Trusts are doing their level best to ensure this happens.

“But as we head towards winter, there are real concerns over whether we have the capacity – including beds and staff – to deal with the pressures ahead.”

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