Annual conference and exhibition 2017

7-8 November, ICC Birmingham

Highlights from #NHSP17

More than 600 NHS leaders came together in Birmingham to discuss solutions to many of the health service’s most pressing challenges at our annual conference on 7-8 November.

Our conference, developed with input from trusts, covered a range of critical issues, including quality of care, NHS finances and the workforce challenge.

Delegates heard from a range of influential speakers, including: Simon Stevens, chief executive of NHS England; Jim Mackey, chief executive of NHS Improvement; Jeremy Hunt, secretary of state for health; Claire Murdoch, national mental health director at NHS England; Dr Paul Lelliott, the CQC’s deputy chief inspector (mental health); Alastair McLellan, editor of HSJ; and Sidney Dekker, Professor, School of Humanities, Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia.

The conference has been reported, with high profile coverage on the BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and Sky News, as well as in the national and trade print media. This was informed by new commentary and analysis we published on the workforce challenge and on NHS finances ahead of the 2017 Budget.

Catch up on the discussions at the conference by visiting Twitter via the hashtag #NHSP17, and view our day one and day two round-ups.

Conference news

News 09 Nov

Media coverage from #NHSP17

A round up of the media coverage of our annual conference

Our 2017 annual conference and exhibition was well showcased by the national print and broadcast, trade and local media. We welcome journalists from the Guardian, the Daily Telegraph, the Times, Daily Mirror, Daily Mail, the Sun, BBC, Sky News, and ITN.

The publication of our latest workforce report – There for us: A better future for the NHS workforce, the opening address by NHS Providers chief executive Chris Hopson, and keynote addresses from Jim Mackey (NHS Improvement), Simon Stevens (NHS England) and the health secretary, Jeremy Hunt were widely covered.

Channel 4 News produced a short news item which summarised our theme for the conference – Pressure, and highlights from second day.

There for us

The BBC reported that NHS staff in England are working on the "edge of safety" as rising demand is outstripping the increasing numbers being employed.

The Guardian warned that uncertainty over the future of EU staff in the NHS is so damaging that it threatens the quality of care received by patients.

Sky News reported that staff shortages in the NHS pose a fundamental risk to patient safety and quality of care. It pulled out survey findings that the majority (66%) believe workforce issues are the "single biggest risk facing services.”

The Independent reported that NHS leaders are calling on the government to reform immigration policy to make it easier to recruit doctors and nurses from overseas and fill significant gaps left by UK workforce shortages. It highlighted our figures that 85% of trusts say overseas recruitment will be key to keep services running over the next three years.

The Daily Mail pulled out comparison figures from Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, highlighted in our report, to warn that the UK is more reliant on overseas doctors and nurses than almost any other healthcare system in the developed world.

Nursing Times highlighted language testing as another key barrier to recruiting the staff that the NHS needs.

Public Finance write that NHS Providers has accused the government of “a fundamental failure at a national level” to ensure it has adequate staffing. It highlights that we make recommendations including an expansion of medical education to ensure a supply of highly trained staff and reversing cuts to training budgets. We also called on the NHS to continue to recruit from overseas.

Our workforce findings were well covered by broadcast channels. Saffron Cordery, director of policy and strategy at NHS Providers featured in news bulletins on BBC Breakfast, BBC Radio 4 and BBC Radio 5 programming, she was also quoted through across BBC and commercial radio stations.

Paul Myatt, policy advisor – workforce, carried out local radio interviews with BBC Radio Coventry, BBC Radio Oxford, BBC Radio Shropshire, BBC Northampton, BBC Somerset and BBC North East.

BBC News at One included an interview with Saffron and footage filmed at Kingston hospital. Saffron was also interviewed by the BBC News Channel and featured as part of a pre-recorded package on Sky News Sunrise.  

Comment pieces

We accompanied the report with an editorial by Saffron which was published by the Guardian Healthcare Network, in which she outlines some of the key workforce challenges and recommendations.

This follows a piece in the New Statesman a week before which reiterates our call for the government to confirm right to remain for EU nationals, on which the NHS now greatly depends.

Read our workforce report – There for us: A better future for the NHS workforce

 

The opening address

Ahead of NHSP17, NHS Providers chief executive Chris Hopson gave an exclusive interview in the HSJ. Teasing a key theme of his speech, he argued that national leaders needed to acknowledge that the NHS was deep in the “red zone” in a way that is not sustainable.

The Telegraph  wrote that NHS Providers has called for a cash injection to get the health service out of “the red zone” - warning it was heading back to the poor performance of the 90s

The Guardian writes that Chris warned finances were already so tight, and the service under so much pressure, that it could no longer meet its obligations to provide timely care, such as treating A&E patients within four hours and performing non-urgent operations in hospital within 18 weeks.

The I newspaper reported that the NHS is experiencing “the worst of times” as sustained financial pressures leave it permanently in “the red zone”.  

The Daily Mail covered the claim that the UK would need to invest an extra £900 per patient to match the healthcare spending in Germany.

The speech was also covered locally by local print titles.

Read the full speech on our website.

Key note address from Simon Stevens

On day two, Simon Stevens, chief executive of NHS England, delivered his key note address to NHSP17.

The BBC covered his call for the health service to get the cash boost it was promised during the EU referendum.

The I newspaper led with his warning that more than five million people will soon be on NHS waiting lists unless the health service receives urgent funding.

Alongside this, the Health Foundation, The King's Fund and the Nuffield Trust - carried out a joint analysis of NHS finances in England and argued that the NHS requires an increase of at least £4 billion in funding over the next two years to avoid patient care from deteriorating. This joint analysis was published alongside our own budget demands.

Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt argued that £300m could be saved from the NHS's £30bn supplies bill if every organisation paid the lowest price for items. He also outlined plans to publish a draft workforce strategy in time for the 70th anniversary of the health service.

In response to the speech by Simon Stevens, Saffron Cordery was interviewed by BBC News at Ten and BBC Radio 5 Live Drive, while head of analysis, Phillippa Hentsch undertook media interviews with the BBC News Channel, LBC and TalkRadio.

 

News 08 Nov

#NHSP17 day two round up

We take a look back at the plenary sessions from day two of our annual conference.

Day one of our annual conference and exhibition has now come to a close – below is a round-up of the day’s activities. 

Day two plenary summaries

We opened day two with Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt, secretary of state for health, who outlined plans for a new national workforce strategy to be published next year. Read our storify summary.

Simon Stevens, chief executive of NHS England, called for additional funding in the upcoming Budget, warning that hospital waiting lists could grow by a quarter to five million by 2021. Take a look our storify summary and our response to both speeches.

Other plenary speeches

We welcomed Claire Murdoch, national mental health director at NHS England who delivered a keynote speech on her ambitions for mental health and the Five-year-forward-view, joined by Dr Paul Lelliott, deputy chief inspector of hospitals (mental health) at the Care Quality Commission; and Melanie Walker, chief executive of Devon Partnership NHS Trust. Read our storify summary here.

Our conference came to a close with Professor Sidney Dekker, international safety expert at Griffith University who shared thoughts on just culture and the pathway to greater trust in your organisation. View our storify summary here.

Our budget asks

In our budget submission and blog, we urge the chancellor to seize the opportunity to help the health service escape from an impossible trap, as it struggles to meet soaring demand in the midst of an unprecedented financial squeeze.

2018 dates

We’re pleased to announce that our 2018 annual conference will take place on 9 – 10 October in Manchester. Do block out your diaries for next year and look out for further details soon.


News 08 Nov

Failure to boost funding will have consequences for patients

We respond to a warning from Simon Stevens, chief executive of NHS England that waiting lists will grow without additional funding for the NHS.

  • Health secretary and NHS England chief executive deliver speeches at NHS Providers conference
  • Simon Stevens warns hospital waiting lists could grow to five million by 2021 without funding increase
  • We welcome address and the public acknowledgment that the NHS can no longer deliver what it needs to on the funding available

 

Health secretary Jeremy Hunt and NHS England chief executive Simon Stevens have delivered key note addresses at the NHS Providers annual conference in Birmingham.

The health secretary outlined plans for a national workforce strategy to be published next year.

Simon Stevens used his address to call for additional funding in the upcoming Budget and warned that without it hospital waiting lists could grow by a quarter to five million by 2021.

 

Responding to the speeches by Jeremy Hunt and Simon Stevens at the NHS Providers annual conference in Birmingham, the chief executive of NHS Providers, Chris Hopson, said:

The NHS can no longer deliver what it needs to on the funding available and it is important that Simon Stevens has said this for the first time clearly and publicly.

“We strongly welcome the directness, honesty and clarity of what Simon Stevens has said today. We have been arguing for some time that the NHS can no longer deliver what it needs to on the funding available and it is important that Simon Stevens has said this for the first time clearly and publicly.

“He is right to warn that without extra funding there will be consequences for patients, who will have to wait longer, and may not get the treatment they should have when they need it.

“We are all now clear about the importance of the decision that the government faces in the forthcoming budget.

“Our call for a workforce strategy has clearly been heard. However there is a very significant difference between a future plan to grow workforce numbers and a much wider workforce strategy which addresses the key challenges the NHS is facing – as set out in our report There for us: a better future for the NHS workforce.”

 

News 07 Nov

#NHSP17 day one round up

We take a look back at the plenary sessions and report launches from day one of our annual conference

Day one of our annual conference and exhibition has now come to a close – below is a round-up of the day’s activities. 

Chris Hopson's conference speech

In his speech earlier this morning, chief executive Chris Hopson spoke about leadership and how we should lead the NHS in this increasingly difficult context. You can view his full speech online, an interview with HSJ and a storify summary of his session.

Day one plenary summaries

Jim Mackey reflected on his time as chief executive of NHS Improvement and shared his thoughts on where the provider sector is heading. Take a look at our storify round up.

Our afternoon panel focused on STPs and gathered perspectives from local leaders including Dr Graham Jackson, co-chair of the NHSCC; Sarah Dugan, chief executive of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust; and Nick Hulme, chief executive of Colchester University NHS Foundation Trust. Read our storify summary.

Journalists and commentators from The Times, the Guardian, ITV News and HSJ explored how pressure on services affects the reputation of the NHS, sharing experiences of reporting from the frontline. View our summary from storify here.

Launch of major new workforce report

Earlier today, we launched a major new report, There for us: a better future for the NHS workforce. Our report provides a comprehensive overview of where the workforce challenges are greatest, how these have developed, and what needs to be done to address them. The report is available online, along with a number of supporting resources

Improving the lives of junior doctors

Our joint report developed with NHS Improvement and the Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management identified eight high-impact actions to improve the working conditions of junior doctors. You can view the report on our website.

Joint guide on accountable care with Hempsons

We also launched a joint guide with Hempsons, our event partner, which identifies seven key steps STPs and their partner organisations should consider to support the evolution to accountable care. The report is available to download online.

What does pressure mean to you?

We spoke to delegates to gather their thoughts on what pressure means to them. Take a look at our video snapshot from day one.

Day two highlights

Our plenary speakers include Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt, secretary of state for health; Simon Stevens, chief executive of NHS England; Claire Murdoch, national mental health director of NHS England; and Professor Sidney Dekker, international safety expert from Griffith University.

We have a range of strand sessions focusing on themes of money, quality and workforce.

In the exhibition we have a number of suppliers looking to support you to deliver high-quality care for patients. And our provider showcase enables trusts to share examples of their innovative work – do take a look if you can.

To stay up-to-date, download our app and follow our #NHSP17 hashtag. We look forward to seeing you tomorrow.

Blog 07 Nov

How should we lead the NHS in this increasingly difficult context?

Chris Hopson delivers the opening address at #NHSP17

Hello, good morning and welcome to the NHS Providers annual conference and exhibition. Our flagship annual event and the single biggest gathering for provider board members in the NHS calendar.

This event couldn’t happen without the support of our sponsors and I’d particularly like to thank our overall event partners Newton and Hempsons; our strand partner Allocate; and both the GMC and NHS England who are delivering our breakfast sessions tomorrow morning.

Can I please encourage you to support all our commercial partners and spend as much time as possible in our exhibition which you’ll find in Hall 3

Can I also thank you for coming. I know how busy and stretched you are and how difficult it can be to take time out. But I hope you will agree with us that it is important to take time to review our challenges and develop and share solutions.

How do we lead the NHS in this context?

This is my sixth annual conference and exhibition speech. I’m beginning to feel like a veteran. I normally cover a range of topics but this year I want to cover just one. It’s this. How should we lead the NHS in this increasingly difficult context?

I address the issue with some humility. I’ve never run a frontline trust so it’s not my place to tell you how to do your job. And when we talk about good leadership, there are bound to be different opinions and mine is just one.

But my time is equally divided between talking to you, local trust leaders, and to our national system leaders – ministers, civil servants and those running the arm's-length bodies. So I get to look at that national/local leadership relationship, day in day out, and study it in detail.

And that’s what I want to talk about today. How should our national system leaders interact with frontline trust leaders to ensure the NHS delivers the consistently high quality of patient care that is our collective ambition and endeavour?

The current NHS context – the best of times and the worst of times

The obvious place to start is the current context. I was listening to Sir Bruce Keogh the other day when he described the current position, drawing on Dickens, as both the best of times and the worst of times.

The best of times

It’s the best of times because, when we look back in 25 years, we will realise that we were on the edge of a remarkable technology driven revolution that dramatically improved health outcomes.

We know that personal mobile technology, artificial intelligence, robotics and genomics will transform healthcare.

Genomics, for example, will enable us to predict who is at risk from certain diseases. It will enable us to take preventative action to prevent disease developing in many people in the first place. And when disease does occur, genomics will enable precision treatment. We are about five years ahead of any other country in beginning to integrate genomics into our routine pathology services.

As Alan Milburn, one of our NHS Providers lecturers reminded us, however difficult the strategic context, we must always remember to balance the challenge with these opportunities. We have some extraordinary opportunities to improve patient care in front of us and we need to seize them with both hands.

And there are two other reasons why it remains the best of times.

One is the enduring power of the key principle behind the NHS. The idea that great patient care should be provided to everyone, free at the point of use, based on clinical need, not ability to pay.

A principle that has given us one of the fairest, most equitable, most efficient healthcare systems in the world, with some of the widest population coverage, as the Commonwealth Fund reminded us just a couple of months ago.

No wonder then, that the NHS consistently remains the single biggest reason why people are proud to be British. For them, the NHS is a bigger source of national pride than our history, the royal family, our democratic system, our armed forces or the BBC.

The NHS consistently remains the single biggest reason why people are proud to be British

Chris Hopson    Chief Executive

And when many of those other institutions have faced considerable criticism, pride in the NHS endures. Rightly so.

And, of course, it will always be the best of times to work alongside our frontline clinical colleagues. Since we were last together in this hall, we have seen so many examples of the bravery, commitment and professionalism of NHS staff.

From the Westminster Bridge and Borough Market terrorist incidents to the Manchester Arena bombing and the Grenfell Tower fire. Ordinary people doing extraordinary things 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 52 weeks a year.

Not just the immediate things like running towards life threatening danger, not away from it, in the first hour of an incident. But providing the ongoing back up and support in the community in the weeks and months after. Great patient care that is just as important but is often overlooked.

The worst of times

But it’s also, in some respects, the worst, the most challenging, of times.

We are in the middle of the longest and deepest financial squeeze in NHS history.

We’re seeing real pressure on our mental health and community services with a particular public focus on our inability to meet the rapidly growing demand for child and adolescent mental health services.

For the first time since they were introduced, despite best efforts, last year the NHS missed all four of the long standing acute and ambulance performance standards. The four-hour A&E standard. The 18-week elective surgery standard. The 62-day cancer standard. The ambulance response time target.

We also have prolonged, significant and widespread workforce shortages that are making it increasingly difficult to provide services where, when and how they should be provided.

Running the NHS permanently in the red zone

To me it sometime feels like we are in the middle of an old World War Two film.

I see the NHS as a Royal Navy destroyer crashing through a stormy sea being buffeted by wave after wave of surging demand. Fuel is running low. The captain calls for more power. The needle on the engine room pressure dial goes above 100%, and becomes stuck deep in the red zone.

After ten minutes of running at absolute maximum power the engines falter and the ship shudders. Nervous glances cross the bridge. How much longer can the ship stay in the red zone?

Excuse the dramatic licence, but we are now trying to run the NHS above its sustainable limits, well into the red zone. And there’s a danger we’re trying to do that permanently, not just for a short, temporary, period.

There are red zone warning signs wherever you look.

We are now trying to run the NHS above its sustainable limits, well into the red zone. And there’s a danger we’re trying to do that permanently, not just for a short, temporary, period. There are red zone warning signs wherever you look.

   

An enduring, underlying, provider sector financial deficit, estimated by the Nuffield Trust to be around £3.5bn, that the National Audit Office has described as a long way from sustainable.

59% of NHS staff working unpaid overtime each week. A level of effort that it’s reasonable to ask for every so often. But not day in day out.

And, in perhaps the most apt example of the red zone, running too many of our inpatient mental health and acute wards at too high a capacity level too often. For example, mental health inpatient facilities running at occupancy rates of over 100% as we have to put patients into beds at the weekend when other patients are on weekend leave.

Overstretched district nursing services that can only meet the demand they face by squeezing the time available for individual appointments, making the provision of compassionate care much more difficult.

Key public health services like drug and alcohol addiction and sexual health services trying to keep up with rising demand and avoid more serious, costly, hospital referrals on ever decreasing budgets.

Trusts in the red zone

Running the NHS permanently in the red zone also has consequences for individual trusts and their leadership teams too.

The key principle used to be that a well run trust should be able to meet its performance targets and deliver a 5% financial surplus to allow for investment in new treatments and vital maintenance.

When I took up this job five years ago, the vast majority of trusts were achieving that standard. Now, despite working at full stretch, none are.

However hard trusts try and however good a job their frontline staff do, providers are finding it increasingly difficult to hit their performance and financial targets. Only able to make their finances work by delaying capital spend, adjusting the accounts or selling land. Nervously watching as the backlog maintenance bill balloons and the estate starts to crumble.

And a growing, tangible, frustration that the hard fought gains of the 2000s across a range of measures – for example, waiting times and single sex wards – are starting to slip back at increasing pace.

Once every so often you get one of those emails that captures the picture perfectly. This one, which arrived about six weeks ago, was from one of our longest serving and most respected trust CEOs. In their words:

 

In the last 18 months I have seen a reversal of what has been a long-term improvement trend. In 2016/17 we saw the first year-on-year increase for 10 years in mortality rates in our hospital and cases of hospital acquired infection. We failed the A&E target for the first time in eight years and our true financial position was a record low of just £100,000 above break even. This year the mortality rate is stabilising but infections continue to increase, our A&E performance continues to deteriorate and it will be a miracle if we break even in real terms. All of this supposed ‘poor performance’ is with the same team of managers and clinicians who have won the trust a large number of awards and who are still making herculean efforts to keep our services safe, effective and caring. I feel as though I am the captain of a much-loved but slowly sinking ship whose crew are bailing out water faster and faster to stay afloat but cannot continue to do so indefinitely.

   

Herculean efforts is about right. As is the fact that more and more trusts are finding it difficult to keep their heads above water.

Providers deliver

I think, given this context, providers have done some amazing things over the last two years.

Stabilising provider finances and reducing a ballooning deficit from £2.5bn to £800m in a single year.

Developing, at real pace, a significantly increased focus on mental health including introducing the world’s first mental health access standards.

Coping with increasing demand levels a long way above what the Five-year forward view ever predicted and ensuring performance hasn’t fallen off a cliff edge.

Cutting the agency staffing bill by 20% - £750m - in really short order.

Realising £3.1bn of annual cost improvement programme gains, a whopping 3.7% of spend.

Taking the lead in many local systems to develop STPs, pioneer new ways of delivering care and deliver the Five-year forward view transformation.

It’s been an extraordinary performance.

The issue, as Jim Mackey succinctly put it, is that we have do it all over again this year and next year too.

So my question is how can national system leaders help trusts sustain this level of performance year in year out? What can they do to support trusts to keep performing at this level this year, next year, and the year after that? What is the give and the get in the system?

What we need from our national leaders

I think we need four things from our national system leaders.

Recognition of how difficult the context now is.

A deliverable task.

Trust and respect.

And more support.

Let me take each of those in turn. And then I’ll more briefly set out what I think the get from trust boards might be in response for this national level give.

Recognition of the difficult context

The first ask of national leaders is explicit recognition of the difficulty of the current context.

That a financially squeezed NHS, with growing workforce shortages, is finding it increasingly difficult to keep up with increasing demand and expectations, even though it’s running at absolutely full stretch.

It worries me that, at the moment, we seem to have a rapidly increasing gap between the national system level view of how the NHS is faring and the view from the frontline.

The frontline view is as I have described. That we’re trying to run the NHS permanently in the red zone and that the current position is not sustainable.

The system-level view stresses how more money than ever before is being invested in the NHS and how many extra staff the NHS now has.

Yes, the NHS budget and staff numbers are growing.

The question, though, is whether they are growing fast enough to allow the NHS to keep up with demand, preserve care quality and meet the performance standards the government has committed to. They currently aren’t.

When distributed delivery systems like the NHS come under the degree of performance pressure we are currently under, one of two things tends to happen.

Either the system pulls together to address the challenges it faces.

Or it pulls apart with national and local leaders blaming each other in an escalating cycle of recrimination.

National leaders blaming local leaders for not trying hard enough or doing their job well enough.

Local leaders blaming national leaders for setting them an impossible task.

If we are to pull together as a single system, we need a single, shared, evidence-based, objective view of our strategic context and where we really are.

A deliverable task

A closely linked, second, requirement of national leaders is a deliverable task. Ensuring that what national leaders ask of local trust leaders can genuinely be delivered.

We must return to a position where well run trusts can consistently and sustainably succeed, year in, year out, in the task they have been asked to deliver.

At the heart of this is a core requirement for all public services – to match the service provided and the funding envelope.

As I argued last year, the NHS faces a particular issue here as, unlike any other public services, we have a set of detailed, clearly defined, highly scrutinised, constitutional performance standards that need to be met.

Reinforced by a rigorous, well resourced and all encompassing CQC inspection regime.

The NHS can’t, as other public services have done, cut staff, reduce opening hours, change service eligibility criteria, reduce service quality or close services altogether to fit the money.

But we have now reached the point where it is no longer possible to meet those NHS constitutional performance standards on current funding levels.

That’s not a particular surprise given that we’ve had seven years of NHS demand and cost rising by 4% a year on average but NHS funding only rising by an average 1% a year.

It’s particularly not a surprise when you realise, as the Nuffield Trust has recently shown, that between 2010 and 2015, trusts have had annual year on year cuts of 4% to the prices they are paid for treatment through the tariff and through linked levels of block contract spending.

So if, in 2010, a trust received £100 to treat or care for a patient, in 2015 they only received £92.50 for exactly the same treatment or care.

But it’s actually even worse than that. Costs have risen in the meantime. So, by 2015, that 2010 £100 had fallen in real terms to just £80.00.

Trust leaders are clear what they want. They want to meet the standards. But they are equally clear they can only do so if they have the funding and staff required.

So we’re in danger of getting stuck in an impossible trap. There isn’t enough funding or staff to meet the standards. But there are still too many who think the standards are deliverable if only providers tried harder or did their job better.

So we’re in danger of getting stuck in an impossible trap. There isn’t enough funding or staff to meet the standards. But there are still too many who think the standards are deliverable if only providers tried harder or did their job better.

   

It’s why the forthcoming Budget is so important. It’s our one chance, right at the beginning of the new parliament, to ensure the NHS has a deliverable task. That we match the NHS delivery ask with the funding available.

The argument for extra funding for the NHS is clear and we’re proud to have led that argument.

We even had that arch disciple of fiscal rectitude Sir Oliver Letwin arguing for more money for health and care on the Today Programme last week.

The simple point is that if we want the best care, we have to pay for it. UK health spending would need to be around £24bn, or 13% higher, to match current German or French levels of health spending.

If we wanted to spend as much per head of population as the French do, we’d need to be spending £300 a year more per person. To match the Germans we’d need to be spending a whopping £900 a year more per person. Sobering figures which show that in the end, as my Dad used to say, you get what you pay for.

But, equally important, and much less focussed on, is the need to ensure that what is asked of the NHS matches the funding available.

We’ve seen over the last 18 months how corrosive it is for the NHS to over promise and under deliver.

To create a delivery plan that is based on far too optimistic a set of assumptions about how we can supposedly rapidly reduce demand despite a growing, older, population…

… how we can supposedly realise savings levels that no other advanced Western health systems has ever realised…

…And how we can supposedly deliver at record pace across a huge range of widely dispersed priorities.

So whatever funding settlement comes out of the Budget, we must create a delivery plan that has a reasonable set of priorities.

With a realistic and deliverable performance trajectory for each priority.

With complete and total alignment between all key system leaders on those priorities and trajectories.

And genuine involvement of frontline leaders so they can assure that the plan is deliverable and can feel genuine ownership of what’s being asked of them.

In short, a deliverable task, with appropriate stretch, that trusts have a realistic chance of achieving. So we can restore everyone’s confidence that the NHS can and does deliver on its promises.

Trust and respect

The third ask of national leaders is that they trust and respect that local leaders are doing everything they can to maximise performance within their trusts.

I’m going to be blunt and challenging here because I think the situation deserves it.

One of the more difficult aspects of my role is hearing some of the things that are said at the national level about trust leaders. I’ve alluded to some of it already.

That providers aren’t trying hard enough. That they could and should be doing a lot more to hit their performance and financial targets.

That, as a cadre, top trust leadership is poor, substandard or inadequate. That there are only 40 or so good trust chief executives in the country.

That when providers leaders raise legitimate concerns about their ability to deliver what’s asked of them, they are just complaining and trying to avoid their responsibilities.

All things I have heard over the last 12 months.  

I don’t believe any of them.

All the trust leaders I meet are stretching every sinew to deliver the outstanding patient care to which they are passionately committed.

There is absolutely no evidence that NHS trust leaders, as a group, are any less capable than their local government, education or prison service leader colleagues.

There is a simple but important truism. If a few trusts miss their targets when all others are meeting theirs, it’s likely to be a local trust or local system problem. But if almost every trust is consistently missing their targets, as is now the case, it’s likely to be a national system level problem.

There is a simple but important truism. If a few trusts miss their targets when all others are meeting theirs, it’s likely to be a local trust or local system problem. But if almost every trust is consistently missing their targets, as is now the case, it’s likely to be a national system-level problem.

   

Some will interpret this as the providers’ trade union arguing that poor performing trust leaders should not be held to account. It isn’t.

Normal distribution alone suggests that, in a class of 230, some will inevitably struggle, particularly as the chief executive role becomes more difficult.

And the success of the aspiring CEOs programme we have created with NHS Improvement and the NHS Leadership Academy shows the power of investing in the development of trust leaders.

But if we end up thinking that the current performance problems in the NHS are largely due to systemic poor trust leadership, I fear we are in danger of losing the plot.

There is a particular issue around chief executives in the most challenged trusts – the places where senior leadership performance is likely to be under the greatest scrutiny.

The NHS has a poor record of unreasonable impatience here.

These trusts usually have long seated, intractable, problems – often of geography, workforce gaps and system weakness. Failure to meet targets in these trusts can often be as much due to system level failure – in social care or general practice – as the failure of individual providers.

And it’s no coincidence that many challenged local health and care systems often have other public services that are failing too.

Chief executives in many of these trusts have been on a merry go round, with the HSJ showing recently that the average tenure of chief executives in the most challenged trusts is just 11 months. Surprise surprise, the average tenure for chief executives in CQC outstanding rated trusts is seven years.

It also cannot make sense for eight of the most challenged trusts to have had four chief executives in the last three years, as the HSJ also found. That way lies continued failure.

The success of Lesley Dwyer at Medway and Claire Panniker at Basildon, to quote just two examples, shows that when we give the right chief executives the time and air cover to match their talent, they will succeed.

But there is a risk that as the performance pressure on the NHS mounts, the merry go round will speed up once again.

Removing trust leaders should always be a last resort. And our national system leaders should be wary of trying to form their own judgements on which chief executives should go and which should stay.

Removing trust leaders should always be a last resort. And our national system leaders should be wary of trying to form their own judgements on which chief executives should go and which should stay.

   

It is the task of trust boards to reach an evidence-based, rounded, judgement on where a chief executive is failing and where a new chief executive is needed and to then effect the required change with respect and dignity.

Either we trust and respect chairs and non-executive directors to performance manage their trust leadership teams or we might as well not have them at all.

Trust and respect also means our national system leaders wanting to genuinely listen and understand local leaders’ perspectives and then work out how the national system can support them more effectively.

Twelve months ago the entire NHS senior leadership, NHS Providers included, signed up to the new NHS national improvement and leadership development strategy.

At its heart is the concept of compassionate leadership. Defined, and I quote, as “paying close attention to all staff; really understanding the situations they face; responding empathetically; and taking thoughtful and appropriate action to help”.

That wasn’t how it felt to the chairs and chief executives of the trusts with the most challenged A&E performance who attended a meeting with system leaders seven weeks ago.

The issue wasn’t just that some trust leaders were asked to chant “Yes we can”, patronising, inappropriate and parent/child though that was.

It was a perceived lack of willingness among some national leaders to listen and try to understand the situation that trust leaders face on the ground. To respond empathetically. And to work out how national leaders could take appropriate action to help, not just issue a blunt “improve your performance or else” warning.

As the performance pressures on the NHS mount, it is incredibly important that we all stay true to the values and behaviours of compassionate leadership that we all signed up to 12 months ago. With trust and respect at their heart.

Support

Which brings me neatly onto the fourth ask of national leaders - more support please.

The only way the NHS will meet the significantly increased performance challenge it now faces is if national system leaders significantly increase their support for local leaders.

We all know what can happen at a national level when performance pressures mount in the NHS.

Arm's-length bodies scurry around in ever-decreasing circles gathering more and more information; checking what’s happening at the frontline more and more frequently; and exhorting that frontline more and more strongly.

Often just to demonstrate that they, as arms length bodies, are on top of the situation and doing all they can.

A lot of this activity is wasted effort. Worse than that, it’s usually counter productive as the frontline has to respond to this frenetic blizzard of activity, diverting valuable time, energy and resource from where it’s actually needed - delivering frontline care.

It becomes particularly difficult when multiple different layers of multiple different arm's-length bodies ask for effectively the same information in multiple different formats covering multiple different time periods.

What we need to do is to invert the current top down, check and control model of arm's-length body activity into a bottom up, serve and support the frontline model.

Don Berwick has a great story about what’s needed. It’s stuck with me ever since I first heard it though I will, admittedly, embellish and paraphrase it a little.

Imagine a group of student hikers out for a long hike. It’s towards the end of the day. The night is beginning to fall, bringing potential danger. But a couple of the hikers, through no fault of their own, are beginning to fall behind. How do the group leaders respond?

Is it to berate the stragglers for failing to keep up and telling them to look at how well the rest of the group is doing?

Is it to keep telling the stragglers the speed they need to go at, asking them to report their actual speed every five minutes and then keep checking they are meeting the required pace, with the group leaders assuring themselves that this checking process is being done correctly?

Is it calling the group together to lecture the stragglers on the need to increase their speed or else they will be thrown out of the group altogether?

Or is it, perish the thought, calling the group together and asking it to chant in unison “we can do it”.

It is, of course, none of the above.

It’s about asking those who are struggling what help and support they need. Listening carefully to what support they ask for, with no preconceptions of what support the group leaders think they should have. Doing everything possible to offer the requested support. And, where possible, the rest of the group rallying around to provide what support they can. Trusting and respecting that the stragglers will do their absolute best.

That is what we need our arm's-length bodies to do – provide more support for frontline leaders. And it will require a significant change in how they currently do business.

The ask of local leaders

So if the ask of national system leaders is recognition of how difficult the context now is; a deliverable task; trust and respect; and more support…

…What is the ask of local leaders? What’s the local get for the national give?

It’s not my place to make commitments on behalf of the sector but it does feel right and proper to briefly highlight four areas where local leaders will also need to step up to the plate to meet the challenges the NHS faces.

First, it is vital that the sector continues to believe that, however difficult the strategic context may be, the right management actions can make a difference.

One of the big dangers of the current context is that providers become powerless victims of the deteriorating context believing, as I’ve said, that however hard they try, they cannot succeed.

That’s why the CQC’s report in June of eight case studies of trusts who’ve increased their rating – five trusts by two ratings, three by one rating – is so important. It shows that systematic improvement is possible, even in the most challenging of contexts. If you haven’t read it, I would urge you to do so.

Provider leaders need to continue stretching every sinew to deliver as well as they can – for patients and service users, for local communities and for their staff.

Provider leaders need to continue stretching every sinew to deliver as well as they can – for patients and service users, for local communities and for their staff.

   

Second, and closely allied, we need to retain the right balance of realism about the current context – calling it as it is – and optimism – believing that, despite the scale of the current challenges, we can continue to deliver outstanding patient care. I know I personally find it difficult to consistently strike that balance at the moment. But it’s vital we do so, particularly for our staff.

Third, that we remain committed to the idea of reasonable performance stretch. It would be easy as the pressure mounts to lower our ambition – for example to just concentrate on the increasingly difficult operational delivery task and put transformation on the backburner when, in reality, we have to do both.

And, fourth and perhaps most importantly of all, recognising that our staff are our single most important asset and our single most important task is to support them to give of their best.

It’s clear they are increasingly feeling the performance pressure. It must be our task to shield them from that pressure as much as possible, enabling them to concentrate on what they do so well – providing outstanding care.

The staff survey data also tells us that we have some big issues to address – on bullying, for example, and ensuring that we better support our black and ethnic minority staff.

I’m particularly struck by how many trusts are now successfully putting workforce issues centre stage, recognising that the solutions to today’s growing workforce challenges lie not just at a national but at a local level and in the right national/local partnership.

Points we make particularly strongly in our new workforce report which we’re launching today and which, again, I hope you will read.

United we succeed, divided we fail

Let me finish by saying that I am optimistic that the current challenges can be met. The NHS has an uncanny knack of not just enduring but delivering despite all that is thrown at it.

But let us all be clear that as national and local leaders in the same system, we have to do this together. United we succeed, divided we fail.

Thank you and I hope you enjoy the rest of the conference.

 

 

Chris Hopson spoke exclusively with the HSJ ahead of our annual conference and exhibition and warned that NHS leaders' careers are at risk over “impossible targets”. Chris warned that there was an unprecedented gulf between the expectations of system and political leaders, and the reality faced by trust managers, and without significant additional funding, the current performance targets were unachievable, and left leaders “stuck in an endless cycle of not being able to succeed”.

Blog 07 Nov

A workforce under pressure

Saffron Cordery outlines the workforce pressures and some of the recommendations from our new workforce report

“I have worked in the NHS for 45 years and never have I seen so many staff work under such pressure for so long.”

These are plain speaking words of a trust chief executive talking about the workforce situation in their organisation.  The language is bold and direct. There is a welcome clarity.

If we’re to deliver the high quality patient care we all want, we must change our approach to NHS workforce so that we have the right number of staff, with the right skills, in the right place.

If we’re to deliver the high quality patient care we all want, we must change our approach to NHS workforce so that we have the right number of staff, with the right skills, in the right place.

Saffron Cordery    director of policy and strategy

In our report "There for us: a better future for the NHS workforce" we diagnose the problems and challenges facing the NHS workforce and then offer some solutions.

 

Demand is growing fast

First. More people than ever are using NHS services provided by hospitals, mental health trusts, community services and ambulances. Demand for services is very high and growing fast. The simple fact is we need more staff than we have to meet that need: emergency admissions are up 10%, ambulance calls are up 15% and diagnostic tests up 19%. The workforce has grown by 6% since 2014.

The simple fact is we need more staff than we have to meet growing need.

Saffron Cordery    Director of Policy and Strategy and Deputy Chief Executive

This means there is a gap, and it’s one that is growing and is increasingly hard to fill. Recruiting new staff and keeping existing staff is more difficult because jobs on the frontline are getting harder and more pressurised.

Another trust leader told us: “In particular services people are leaving because the pressure is so great they are unable to cope.”

Alongside this we can’t get away from the fact that money really is an issue. Many staff have not received a pay rise for many years, despite having seen their jobs become more demanding and working longer hours. And funding is an issue more generally because even if the workforce were available many trusts cannot afford to recruit more. Although the Government is shifting on public sector pay, it does need to be delivered with out strings attached and with additional money so that trusts themselves aren’t footing the bill.

Although the Government is shifting on public sector pay, it does need to be delivered with out strings attached and with additional money so that trusts themselves aren’t footing the bill.

Saffron Cordery    director of policy and strategy


Closing the NHS pay gap 

Second. It’s imperative that we close this gap. Right now “the NHS is significantly dependent on the ‘heroic’ efforts of clinical and non-clinical colleagues” (NHS trust leader). Relying on discretionary effort is not sustainable. Indeed 59% of NHS staff, for example, said in the last NHS staff survey that they are working unpaid overtime each week.  It’s finally been recognised we need to grow the domestic workforce, and the government has plans to expand medical education, boost the number of nurses and look at apprenticeships, for example. However we don’t know if this is enough, and it won’t happen tomorrow. So it’s certainly not a quick fix.

In the meantime we must acknowledge that we rely on staff from beyond our shores. Thirteen per cent of NHS staff are from outside the UK. They make a very welcome contribution and are helping to plug that gap, and we need them to continue to do so. However the uncertainty created by Brexit and issues such as language testing and immigration policy is making this much, much harder. As one leader put it “We would not be able to maintain high quality care for the people we serve without our diverse workforce. The current lack of progress in the Brexit negotiations is creating unhelpful uncertainty in an already challenging environment.”

“We would not be able to maintain high quality care for the people we serve without our diverse workforce. The current lack of progress in the Brexit negotiations is creating unhelpful uncertainty in an already challenging environment.”

Trust chief executive    

Something that is in trusts’ gift is to make their organisations, and the NHS generally, a great place to work. That means going all out to creating positive cultures and environment, improving the day to day experience for black and minority ethnic staff and adopting a zero tolerance approach to bullying and harassment. Obviously external pressures cut across this, but there is still much that trusts themselves can do.

 

Impact on staff morale

Third, and finally, we need everyone in government and the many other national organisations with responsibility for the NHS to acknowledge the scale of the challenge we are facing in terms of all the issues about pay, recruitment, retention, rising demand and the impact of pressurised working conditions on frontline morale. As one trust leader put it. “Staff are the most important factor in delivery and sustainable staffing is the greatest challenge facing my organisation. I have no real sense that the scale of the challenge is truly understood nationally.”

And, even more importantly, they must speak clearly, with one voice, about how to overcome it. It may surprise many to know that there is no single, workforce strategy for the NHS, despite its strategic importance.

It may surprise many to know that there is no single, workforce strategy for the NHS, despite its strategic importance.

Saffron Cordery    director of policy and strategy

There is hope and much of it lies in recognising that whilst they cannot solve things alone, if local organisations had more control and greater room for manoeuvre they could get on with the task in hand, backed up by greater support from the centre.

However, to go back to the nub of the issue - having enough staff is central to the NHS, which cannot function without them. The final words go to a trust leader who sums up the impact of this:

“…the consequent pressure on the remaining workforce and the impacts on their health and wellbeing and the quality of care they provide give me great cause for concern.”

 

This article was first published by the Guardian Healthcare Network on 7 November 2017

News 07 Nov

No domestic quick fixes on workforce: we must secure overseas recruitment

Our workforce report "There for us: a better future for the NHS workforce" warns that uncertainty over international recruitment is threatening safe, high quality care for patients.

Uncertainty over international recruitment is threatening safe, high quality care for patients a major report by NHS Providers has warned.

There for us: a better future for the NHS workforce says there are no domestic “quick fixes” to the severe workforce shortages in the NHS, and that any significant reduction in the number of overseas staff in the next few years is likely to have a serious and damaging impact on services for the public.

The report criticises the slow, disjointed, response from the Department of Health and its arms-length bodies to the NHS’s growing workforce challenges. It calls for urgent steps to ease intolerable pressures on front line staff, and to develop an NHS workforce fit to meet the growing and changing needs of the population.

Our report calls for urgent steps to ease intolerable pressures on front line staff, and to develop an NHS workforce fit to meet the growing and changing needs of the population.

The report provides a comprehensive overview of where the workforce challenges are greatest, how these have developed, and what needs to be done to address them.

It includes findings from a new survey of NHS mental health, community, ambulance and hospital trusts. Chairs and chief executives from more than half (51%) of NHS trusts responded to the survey. The main findings are: 

 

 

  • two thirds (66 per cent) said workforce concerns were the most pressing challenge in delivering high quality care
  • the vast majority (85 per cent) said it would be important to recruit from outside the UK in the next three years
  • Brexit was seen as the main barrier to recruitment outside the UK over the next three years. More than one in three (38%) mentioned this issue
  • when asked for the biggest challenges to recruitment and retention at their trust, 60 per cent of trust chairs and chief executives cited work pressure and 38 per cent cited pay and reward
  • an overwhelming majority (90 per cent) were doubtful that approaches taken by the Department of Health and its arms length bodies would help them to recruit and retain the staff they needed

The survey also includes powerful commentary from trust leaders (below), reinforcing many of the report’s central conclusions.

 

The analysis describes a growing “workforce gap” which is harming the quality of care.

“Workforce supply and retention are at the top of my risk register and are the single most important thing that prevent the application of the fundamentals of care” [chief executive, mental health trust]

 

The report highlights the impact this is having on workplace pressures and morale, as growing numbers of staff turn their backs on a career in the NHS.

“I have worked in the NHS for 45 years. In that time I have never seen so many staff work under so much pressure for such long periods of time.” [chief executive, acute trust]

“In some area of workforce we only have one third of the workforce in substantive posts.  In particular services people are leaving because the pressure is so great, they are unable to cope.” [chief executive, acute trust]

 

The report warns there are no “quick fixes” to improve the supply of UK-trained staff, yet the outlook for international recruitment is uncertain.

“Without EU and non-EU recruitment, it is going to be very difficult to adequately staff services for the next 5-10 years” [chief executive, mental health trust] 

“The current lack of progress in the Brexit negotiations is creating unhelpful uncertainty in an already challenging workforce environment.” [Chief executive, acute trust]

 

Trust leaders are frustrated that these workforce problems have developed over a number of years “in plain sight” and that NHS system level leadership has been unable to develop appropriate solutions:

Sustainable staffing is the greatest challenge facing my organisation. I have no real sense that the scale of the challenge is truly understood nationally”. [chief executive, acute trust]

 

The report makes detailed recommendations aimed at government, the Department of Health and its arms-length bodies, regulators, and professional associations. These include:

  • set out a fully funded plan to end the pay cap during this parliament
  • urgently confirm the right to remain for the 60,000 EU staff working in the NHS  
  • commit to a future immigration policy that allows trusts to fill posts that cannot be taken – at least for the time being - by the domestic workforce
  • work with trusts to set up an international recruitment programme that they can opt into
  • a clear-sighted strategy to develop the health and care workforce the country requires with skills to meet growing and changing needs
  • greater clarity on the timetable to grow the domestic supply of clinical staff, and backup options should initial plans not succeed as has happened in the past
  • a set of short-term stop-gap solutions to address immediate workforce shortages
  • much greater coherence in workforce strategy, eliminating the current fragmented approach and developing the right national/local relationship

 

The report also sets out what can be done at trust level to make the NHS a great place to work. These include the importance of tackling bullying, developing new roles, improving productivity and providing greater flexibility for staff.

 

The chief executive of NHS Providers, Chris Hopson, said:

“The staff and skills shortages we now see reflect a fundamental failure at national level on workforce strategy. We don’t have enough staff with the right skills and we’re asking far too much of our existing staff. NHS trust leaders are telling us there are no quick fixes to improve the supply of UK-trained staff, and the outlook for international recruitment is uncertain.

The staff and skills shortages we now see reflect a fundamental failure at national level on workforce strategy.

“These problems have developed in plain sight which clearly shows the existing approach is flawed.  

“The government must deliver certainty for EU staff. It should reassure them that their commitment to the NHS is greatly valued and will continue to be welcome. It should also provide assurance on immigration policy so trusts can continue to recruit overseas while we strengthen our workforce here.

“We need a coordinated workforce strategy with clear goals in sight that match the realities of demographic pressures and new approaches to care.

“A better future for the NHS workforce is within our grasp, but we need a commitment from government and national bodies, first to recognise the gravity and urgency of the challenges we face, and then to act.”

 

Blog 19 Oct

Bridging healthcare divides: how collaboration aids learning to deliver better, safer care

Cassandra Cameron outlines the quality strand at this year's annual conference

This year’s quality strand at our annual conference and exhibition, taking place on 7-8 November in Birmingham, will explore three innovative approaches that NHS organisations are taking to bridge conventional healthcare divides, and establish cultures of learning and quality improvement which are underpinned by a systems approach to patient safety.

 

Learning from mistakes

Our first session will focus on how the NHS can improve learning through more effective investigations that take a wider view of patient safety and don’t apportion blame or liability. It is often said that the NHS doesn’t ‘learn enough’ from its mistakes. Sharing learning and good practice are key to reducing variation in care outcomes and making healthcare safer.

However, when learning in the NHS takes place and processes and behaviours change accordingly, it often remains localised to teams or services. Improving how the NHS systematically learns and improves safety has underpinned recent national policy initiatives and the NHS now reports almost 2million incidents a year to the safety-focused National Reporting and Learning System.

The persistent nature of harm begs the question: can the approach we take to learning be a reason why we struggle to improve safety and quality in care?

Cassandra Cameron    Policy Advisor - Quality

 

But the persistent nature of harm – especially falls, pressure ulcers, medication errors, ‘never events’ – begs the question: can the approach we take to learning be a reason why we struggle to improve safety and quality in care?

Healthcare has begun to examine how other safety-critical industries learn from mistakes. Common factors include thematic and systems-based analyses of accidents, and management practices and operating procedures that empower staff to be the strength in the system.

The NHS Human Factors In Healthcare Concordat drew on current safety and quality improvement science across such industries to set out key principles for changing the way the NHS approaches patient safety and preventing, investigating and learning from harm. Central to the Concordat’s ambitions is a stronger alignment of the NHS system to skillfully investigate incidents, identify organisational and system weaknesses that present risk to safety, and build genuine learning organisations.

 

Getting to know the Healthcare Safety Investigations Branch

The new independent Healthcare Safety Investigations Branch (HSIB), led by chief investigator Keith Conradi, has been established to drive this NHS-wide transformation in learning and safety improvement. Since becoming operational in April 2016, HSIB has built a 30-strong investigative team with backgrounds in the NHS, aviation and military investigations and human factors, who will collaborate with and support trusts to build local expertise.

Delegates will learn how members of the Healthcare Safety Investigations Branch (HSIB) team will work with trusts to improve local investigative capability and deliver safer care.

Cassandra Cameron    Policy Advisor - Quality

In our Getting to know the Healthcare Safety Investigations Branch session, delegates will learn from members of HSIB’s team about their wealth of experience, work with the NHS to date, what a ‘safe space’ really means in practice, and how they will work with trusts to improve local investigative capability and deliver safer care.

 

'Zero Suicide' approach

As the second session in our quality strand will discuss, joining up the learning in healthcare is critical with respect to suicide. There is a significant shift taking place incrementally in the NHS that challenges prevailing cultural views about the inevitability of most suicides.

It is driven by mounting evidence that a ‘Zero Suicide’ approach within healthcare can indeed reduce rates of suicide. To succeed, healthcare organisations and their local partners must work together to more proactively screen for and share knowledge about those at risk, improve training for staff, and learn through collaboration with families bereaved by suicide.

Mersey Care, which has developed a scientific model for Zero Suicide was an early adopter of this approach, and zero suicide has also been piloted in the East of England with impressive results. It is clear that a shared vision, based on real partnerships between community groups, the third sector and the statutory sector can unlock previously unrecognised social capital and local knowledge, and develop creative and effective locally tailored approaches that work.

Our second session on why the whole NHS must focus on suicide prevention will explore efforts underway within NHS secondary mental health services and their local partners towards improving awareness and skills for suicide prevention and new technologies to support people vulnerable to suicide. Delegates will be able to hear a first-hand account of why this matters and how it is about to become a priority for all providers across the full spectrum of NHS care.

Our second session explores efforts underway within NHS secondary mental health services and their local partners towards improving awareness and skills for suicide prevention.

Cassandra Cameron    Policy Advisor - Quality

 

Bridging the divide 

The third session in our quality strand will explore early outcomes of a programme designed to bridge another healthcare divide – that between clinicians and managers. With scarce NHS resources more stretched than ever, sustained high quality care depends on a shared understanding between managers and clinical staff of the organisation’s priorities and the decisions needed to achieve and protect them.

There is evidence that these relationships are straining as the financial, workforce and regulatory pressures bite trusts harder. Local systems transformation adds another challenge and clinical engagement in the early phase of STPs has generally not been strong.

As ‘incidental hybrids’, many NHS managers, promoted into their roles from clinical backgrounds, strive to balance the competing operational, managerial and clinical imperatives in their work.

Cassandra Cameron    Policy Advisor - Quality

 

The conflict can also often lie within an individual themselves. Many NHS managers, promoted into their role from clinical backgrounds, are constantly striving to balance the competing operational, managerial and clinical imperatives in their work.  As ‘incidental hybrids’ they tend to learn the management side of their roles on the job and can often struggle to find the time, support and appropriate training to effectively fulfil this dual role.

The Royal College of Physicians’ Chief Registrars programme aims to tackle these issues through a new role, recommended by the Future Hospital Commission, to build stronger leadership, management and quality improvement skills of senior doctors within hospitals.

A recent independent evaluation of the first cohort of 21 chief registrars across 18 NHS acute trusts identified significant benefits for those organisations. These included better communication between junior doctors, with senior clinical leaders and managers, stronger staff engagement and improved morale. 

We explore the early outcomes of a Royal College of Physicians chief registrars programme designed bridge another healthcare divide – that between clinicians and managers.

Cassandra Cameron    Policy Advisor - Quality

  

The Chief Registrar’s quality projects achieved impressive improvements to patient flow, discharge processes, safety, patient experience and rota management. Our fostering clinical leadership for quality improvement: chief registrars as ‘willing hybrids’ session will explore the benefits and challenges of the role and how ‘willing hybrids’ – strategic clinician managers’ - can help trusts improve relationships between senior leaders and the front line through strategic leadership for quality improvement.

 

Bookings for #NHSP17 are still open. Special rates are available for NHS Providers’ members, NHS, charity and public sector delegates. To find out more and register online, visit www.nhsproviders.org/2017

Blog 28 Sep

PRESSURE

Chris Hopson highlights what to look out for at this year's NHS Providers annual conference and exhibition in November.

Pressure. A single word that reflects the state of our NHS in 2017 and the most fitting theme for our annual conference and exhibition.

Pressure is not just a negative phenomenon, though. It can also be an agent of change, driving transformation in the way care is delivered to ensure the sustainability of the NHS.

Pressure can also be an agent of change, driving transformation in the way care is delivered to ensure the sustainability of the NHS.

Chris Hopson    Chief executive

 

Tipping point

The pressure is on to find long term solutions as trusts grapple with the toughest financial squeeze since the NHS was set up nearly 70 years ago. Demand is rising inexorably – reflecting the needs of a population that is living longer, but not living longer healthily. And after seven years of pay restraint, coupled with the uncertainty of Brexit, trusts face an uphill battle to recruit and retain the skilled NHS workforce that we need for the future. These challenges have now reached a tipping point.

The pressure is on to find long term solutions as trusts grapple with the toughest financial squeeze since the NHS was set up nearly 70 years ago.

Chris Hopson    Chief executive

As we head into another busy winter, we have warned that capacity in the system is not at the level needed to manage patient safety risk effectively. We all remember the well-publicised pressures of last winter which, at its height, required the NHS to provide eight district hospitals worth of additional bed capacity. We have to look beyond winter and develop a long term funding and workforce strategy that ensures the NHS can deliver the world class care expected of it whilst preserving the core principle that is so globally admired – that this care is provided free at the point of use, based on clinical need, not ability to pay.

 

Conference programme

This year’s NHS Providers’ annual conference and exhibition at the International Convention Centre (ICC) in Birmingham on 7 and 8 November will shine a light on how providers are responding to these challenges. It will bring together more than 500 leaders and innovators on the front line of care delivery. More than 75% of our delegates are from the NHS, with 68% at director level or above, a higher proportion than any other comparable event in the healthcare calendar.

I’m pleased to say we have confirmed an excellent chair for this year’s event in broadcast journalist, Sarah Montague. Sarah will be questioning the health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, and conducting what we currently expect to be one of the first interviews with Jim Mackey after he’s stepped down as chief executive of NHS Improvement. We’ll also be bringing together some of the top opinion formers and healthcare journalists. The pressure on mental health services has been a key focus for us this year, and we’ll be dedicating plenary time to this key area within our programme of speakers. As always, I also look forward to delivering the opening address.

 

Strand sessions

Three dedicated strand sessions will give delegates a chance to explore the issues and potential solutions in greater depth. As a membership organisation, we value the views of trust leadership and the feedback and input they provide should, rightly, shape the debate.  

Workforce issues are now top of the NHS agenda. We will use our ‘Workforce’ strand to examine in detail what needs to happen to build a coherent national workforce strategy. Our lead session – bringing together leaders from the Department of Health, NHS England, NHS Improvement and Health Education England - will be an opportunity to feed into this important debate directly. We’ll be using the conference to launch a major report on NHS workforce issues, drawing heavily on the views of frontline NHS leaders.

We’ll be using the conference to launch a major report on NHS workforce issues, drawing heavily on the views of frontline NHS leaders.

Chris Hopson    Chief executive

Money remains a pivotal issue for the NHS. The gap between funding and expectations of what the service can deliver continues to grow. Our ‘Money’ strand will explore solutions developed by providers to tackle this pressure. In these sessions we’ll consider the future of the provider tariff and explore the impact of the Carter drive for efficiencies.

Despite these pressures, trusts are continuing to transform the way they deliver care. Our ‘Quality’ strand will feature some of the improvement journeys member trusts have undertaken. We’re particularly pleased to have an in-depth session with Lesley Dwyer, who since 2015, as chief executive of Medway NHS Foundation Trust, has led a remarkable turnaround. The sessions will also shine a spotlight on some of the innovative partnerships continuously improving service delivery.  

 

Provider Showcase

A centrepiece of this event remains the ‘Provider Showcase’, for a close up view of pioneering work carried out by trusts. This year, participants include Barts Health NHS Trust showcasing ‘We Can Talk’ – a co-produced children and young people’s mental health training initiative for staff. West Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust will also be highlighting their ‘earn as you learn’ student paramedic programme.  

A centrepiece of this event remains the ‘Provider Showcase’, for a close up view of pioneering work carried out by trusts.

Chris Hopson    Chief executive

There is also a chance to continue the discussion informally at dinner following the first day of Conference. This is a great opportunity to unwind, and catch up with colleagues old and new across the sector. We’ve also lined up an inspiring after dinner speaker.  Watch this space for further details.

Despite pressure, we are still achieving great things by innovating together as a sector. That is why events like this remain a fantastic opportunity to learn from each other, get creative and celebrate achievements. We very much look forward to seeing you there.

 

Bookings for the #NHSP17 are still open. Special rates are available for NHS Providers’ members, NHS, charity and public sector delegates. To find out more and register online, visit www.nhsproviders.org/2017.  

 

Blog 07 Sep

Finding innovative local solutions to national workforce challenges

Find out more about our workforce strand at this year's NHS Providers Annual Conference and Exhibition in November.

When we think about the NHS being under pressure, workforce challenges immediately spring to mind. In our July State of the NHS provider sector report well over half of trust leaders (57%) were “worried” or “very worried” about their current ability to maintain the right numbers of staff – both clinical and non-clinical – to deliver high-quality care. And we now have a well-evidenced narrative around the particular set of workforce issues affecting the NHS provider sector.

Although the NHS in England has a greater number of clinical staff than ever before, trusts up and down the country are straining to fill the gap created by increases in patient demand for services that are outpacing the workforce pipeline and the funding the NHS has been given to employ staff. These staff shortages risk making the job for the current workforce undoable as more and more is asked of them. As the job gets harder and pay falls in real terms, trusts are struggling to recruit and retain enough staff with the right skills to deliver high quality care. Uncertainty caused by Brexit adds the finishing touch to this difficult national picture.

Well over half of trust leaders (57%) were “worried” or “very worried” about their current ability to maintain the right numbers of staff – both clinical and non-clinical – to deliver high-quality care.

Georgia Butterworth    Policy officer

 

Tackling local problems

And yet, in the face of all this adversity, individual trusts are successfully tackling local problems in different, place-based and tailor-made ways. Given the muddled approach to workforce strategy at a national level, trusts are taking it upon themselves to secure a current and future workforce that is equipped to work in new ways to deal with the increasingly complex needs of patients.

The cumulative momentum of these innovative local programmes has the potential to make a significant contribution to meeting the workforce challenges trusts face. The workforce strand at our annual conference will be an opportunity for some of those trusts at the forefront of innovation to share their progress, experience and learning.

Our conference strand session on what trusts are doing locally will explore how they can grow their own staff and deliver their own training courses. There is genuine concern about the national supply of nurses and doctors not meeting demand, as well as a rising worry that the health care sector is over-reliant on higher education for a sustainable and adequate pipeline of clinical staff.

Our workforce strand at our annual conference will be an opportunity for some of those trusts at the forefront of innovation to share their progress, experience and learning.

Georgia Butterworth    Policy officer

Recent data suggests that the NHS bursary reform has not resulted in a greater number of students starting a nursing degree in 2017, primarily due to the fact that the government did not release funding for clinical placements in time for universities and trusts to expand training places. In this context, trusts are increasingly partnering with local universities to develop innovative ways of training students as well as their existing staff.

After all, the health care sector is first and foremost a people business, with patients and frontline staff at its core. In recent years the NHS as a whole has worked hard to engage more and better with patients and its workforce. Research has shown that good levels of staff engagement are closely linked to higher quality care for patients.

Healthcare is first and foremost a people business, with patients and frontline staff at its core.

Georgia Butterworth    Policy Officer

The key finding of the CQC’s recent report Driving improvement was that empowering staff leads to significant improvements in the quality of care provided and, in correlation, the trusts’ staff survey results improved. At the national level the most recent staff survey suggested some improvements in staff engagement, but there are still cultural problems that must be addressed locally.

In addition, NHS data shows that work-life balance is one of the main reasons health care staff leave the NHS and the NMC also recently published data showing that nurses are leaving the NHS primarily due to working conditions such as staffing levels or workload.

It is clear that work pressure has increased retention problems and, although a big part of this is due to the fundamental mismatch between what the NHS is being asked to do and the resources it has been given, trusts also have a role to play in making themselves great places to work as the direct employers of NHS staff. Our conference session will provide an opportunity to hear more about the impressive work trusts are doing to recruit and retain the staff they need to deliver safe, excellent care.

 

Workforce transformation

Given the national focus on the transformation of service delivery, the integration of health and care, and organisations working together as systems, there is also a pressing need to consider the workforce transformation required to deliver new care models. Teams are becoming increasingly multidisciplinary and mobile as they work across service boundaries. By changing the skill mix of existing roles and teams, and supporting the development of new roles, trusts have been able to bring about effective changes in quality of care, productivity and cross-sector working. For this reason skill mix has now been identified as part of the response to current staff shortages and our conference strand session will highlight examples of best practice. 

By changing the skill-mix of existing roles and teams, and supporting the development of new roles, trusts have been able to bring about effective changes in quality of care, productivity and cross-sector working.

Georgia Butterworth    Policy officer

Our breakout session on what trusts are doing locally will be a rich opportunity for delegates to share, discuss and take away ideas to support their own trusts. The wider workforce strand will also focus on finding solutions to workforce challenges at a national level and ensuring there are enough leaders at all levels of the system to tackle these issues.

  

We are developing a new workforce report which will look at solutions to these challenges to be published at our annual conference and exhibition on 7-8 November in Birmingham. To find out more, visit http://nhsproviders.org/courses-events/annual-events/annual-conference-and-exhibition-2017

Blog 20 Sep

Driving efficiency through innovative digital partnerships

Find out more about our finance strand at this year's NHS Providers Annual Conference and Exhibition in November.

Harold Wilson used to say the only human institution that rejects progress is the cemetery.

Last year’s Accelerated Access Review issued a call to arms for the government and the NHS to speed up patient access to innovative healthcare solutions. For the NHS, this was based on two imperatives: firstly, the sector must actively support the development and enhancement of innovative treatments and care that improves patient outcomes and experience. Secondly, it must pursue solutions that drive value and affordability across the system and ensure the future financial sustainability of the sector.

 

Cost improvement programmes

For those managing the purse strings, it is this second purpose that piques particular interest. As the NHS strives to close the funding gap, each year providers are expected to deliver ambitious cost improvement programmes (CIPs) that are increasingly reliant on non-recurrent savings. These savings are one-off in nature and examples include income generated from selling surplus buildings, or savings from leaving posts temporarily vacant. 

Providers are increasingly turning towards innovative digital solutions that will transform the way care is delivered and will help the sector achieve long term financial sustainability.

Adam Wright    Policy officer - finances

During quarter 1 this year, for example, non-recurrent measures made up 19% of savings achieved, against a plan of only 7%. CIPs should instead be based on solutions that are recurrent and focus on cost reduction, cost avoidance or include service productivity improvements. Providers are increasingly turning towards innovative digital solutions that will transform the way care is delivered and will help the sector achieve long term financial sustainability. For many, this has involved significant collaboration and partnership with the commercial sector to speed up the identification and implementation of these solutions.

 

Opportunities

Within the healthcare sector, and the NHS provider sector in particular, the opportunities are wide ranging. Take, for example, the cost of sequencing a whole human genome, which has fallen from $100m to $1,000 in less than twenty years. The impact this has on personalised medicine will mean that many more health systems will be able to produce far more accurate diagnoses and effective interventions. Tailored therapies that are no longer based on a “one size fits all” approach will lead to a significant reduction in avoidable costs.

Other innovations are focused on improving information sharing by handing patients (and carers) control over their own health information, which enhances decision making and communication with clinicians. By empowering patients like this services may become more productive as new ways of working are developed, based on the rebalance of information sharing.

Changing the way healthcare is delivered, however, often requires input from outside the NHS.

Innovation is always based on the exchange of ideas, regardless of institutional boundaries. The new Innovation and Technology Tariff (ITT), launched in November 2016, hopes to go someway toward improving the uptake of innovation within the NHS, with one category focused on web based applications for the self-management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). But many providers have taken it upon themselves to pursue their own individual partnerships with the commercial sector. This is leading to the proliferation of ideas and opportunities from artificial intelligence to patient generated wearable data.  

Many providers have taken it upon themselves to pursue their own individual partnerships with the commercial sector, generating ideas and opportunities from artificial intelligence to patient generated wearable data.

Adam Wright    Policy officer - finances

For its part, the national leadership of the NHS recognises these developments. Many advances are emerging from new, smaller organisations, partnered in many cases with a single trust, that can often scale up but where in most cases require a skills transfer to take place. The Global Digital Exemplars, as well as the ‘fast followers’, are designed to share their learning and experiences, and will hopefully enable other trusts to take up their innovations and roll out efficiencies across the NHS.

 

Digital partnerships 

Driving efficiency through innovative digital partnerships will be explored at this year’s annual conference in our finance strand. We will hear from trusts who are already working with commercial partners to design and implement digital innovations, and share examples of what worked, how it worked and why it worked. 

Our annual conference finance strand is an opportunity to hear from trusts who are already working with commercial partners to design and implement digital innovations and drive efficiency.

Adam Wright    policy officer - finances

We hope these conversations continue after the session has finished. A lot of progress has already been made in the digital sphere, so it can be difficult to stay on top of the latest developments and advances. The challenges facing the NHS are large, but the solutions could be exciting and radical.

 

 


 

 

 

 

Conference themes

This year’s conference explored how providers are responding to the pressures they face, by bringing together organisations at the forefront of change in the sector.

The conference strand programme enabled delegates to examine key issues in further detail, and included a series of sessions where delegates could debate, discuss and share ideas with expert speakers from within the healthcare sector and beyond.

Our strand themes were:

Money

Funding continues to be a key issue for providers of NHS services, and shows no signs of abating. We explored the pressures, as well as potential solutions, being generated in response to the financial challenge.

Quality

Amid ever-present pressures, this year’s quality strand explored the benefits of strong organisational leadership during periods of rapid transformation and change. Delegates were able to hear examples of remarkable improvement journeys in trusts and looked at examples of successful partnerships for continuously improving care.

Workforce

With workforce now at the top of the NHS agenda, we examined what needs to happen to create a coherent workforce strategy at a national level. We asked: how are trusts increasing local supply and how can the NHS best support its leaders?

Programme


09.00

Registration and exhibition

10.00

Plenary sessions

 

Welcome and introduction

10:00am

Sarah Montague welcomed delegates and opened the conference.

Conference chair

Sarah Montague

Chris Hopson: Opening address

10.10am - Hall 1

Since our annual conference in 2016, the strategic context facing the sector has deteriorated further, putting frontline providers under even greater pressure to deliver. Chris Hopson welcomed delegates and opened the conference with his perspective on the pressure the sector is facing, and gave an update on the opportunities and challenges facing NHS providers.

Keynote speaker

Chris Hopson

Jim Mackey: Where is the provider sector heading?

10:45am - Hall 1

Much has changed in the world of providers since Jim started at the helm of NHS Improvement. The organisation is now seen by many in the sector as a supportive partner rather than a top-down regulator, but many challenges lie ahead for the sector and system of regulation.  Jim Mackey shared his reflections on his time as NHS Improvement's chief executive, before returning to the provider sector to lead Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust.

Keynote speaker

Jim Mackey

11.30

Exhibition, refreshments and networking

12.00

Breakout sessions

 

Investigating for safer NHS care: learning with the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch

12.00pm - Hall 9

The Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch (HSIB) aims to build organisational capability and knowledge to improve system-wide patient safety, free of blame or liability. This session gave delegates an opportunity to meet HSIB investigators, learn about their experience working in other safety critical industries, and discuss the opportunities and challenges facing trusts seeking to deliver improvement for safer healthcare.

This session was part of the quality strand

Payment systems past, present and future

12.00pm - Hall 10

The theory of how payment systems should work in the NHS is well defined. However, less is known about the true impact of the current systems, how incentives actually affect behaviour, and what would need to be changed to improve the effectiveness of incentives and help drive improvements in quality and efficiency. This session looked at the history of payment systems in the NHS, the current systems in use, what future systems should look like and discuss the recent joint NHS Providers – Health Foundation report, on payment systems.

This session was part of the money strand

Practical actions to reduce delayed transfers of care in the north of England

12.00pm - Hall 11a

Newton gave practical and rooted-in-reality help to tackle the complex and long-term challenges of delayed transfers of care. Newton explored the importance of changing long-standing behaviours in both leadership and front-line teams, to deliver on the principle that the outcome for the patient is more important than the process.

It covered work in three areas across the north of England, which has provided a combination of analytical and operational evidence for how to reduce the number of people adversely affected by remaining in hospital. These patients could have been cared for in a different setting, resulting in an improved clinical outcome and a better, more independent life.

 

13.10

Exhibition, lunch and networking

14.10

Breakout sessions

 

Fostering clinical leadership for quality improvement: Chief Registrars as ‘willing hybrids’

2.10pm - Hall 9

The Royal College of Physician’s Future Hospital Commission recommended creating a new, senior leadership role for trainee doctors, focusing on delivering high-quality and safe care. The resulting chief registrar scheme has completed its pilot phase with some remarkable achievements in local quality improvement. The programme is now being rolled out across more acute trusts in the NHS. Session speakers were comprised of chief registrars and their trust’s chief executives, who discussed the benefits and challenges of the role and the difference it can make to performance, staff engagement and quality. They also explored how ‘willing hybrids’ and strategic clinician managers can help bridge the divide between senior leaders and the frontline.

This session was part of the quality strand

What trusts are doing at a local level to tackle workforce challenges

2.10pm - Hall 11a

NHS trusts and foundation trusts are finding it increasingly difficult to recruit and retain enough staff with the right skills to meet the rising demand for the complexity of care. In this challenging national context, individual trusts are tackling different workforce issues locally by implementing a variety of successful projects. A panel of providers shared their learning, demonstrating how trusts can grow their own staff, ensure they are great places to work, and make effective changes in skill-mix.

This session was part of the workforce strand

Accountable care – the art of the possible

2.10pm - Hall 10

There is broad consensus that integration of in and out-of-hospital health and social care is the bedrock of accountable care. But there are also concerns that the current NHS legislative framework may hold back its development.  With no prospect of legislative change in the lifetime of the five year forward view, how far can the NHS move towards new models of accountable care? 

This session focused on the art of the possible, as the place to start. It explored how STPs and their partners can push at the edges but stay within the law in developing accountable care, including even the abolition of the purchaser - provider split.

15.20

Exhibition, refreshments and networking

15.50

Plenary sessions

 

Simplifying the complexity: where are STPs really going?

3:50pm - Hall 1

The NHS is changing – from a focus on individual NHS institutions to integrated local health and care systems, delivering care through sustainability and transformation partnerships and accountable care models. In this session, local leaders from across the NHS, local government and commissioning shared their experiences of how these new approaches are progressing.

Is the NHS reputation under pressure?

4:30pm - Hall 1

A panel of journalists and commentators explored how pressure on services affect the reputation of the NHS. After years of describing pressure on the health service, they discussed what makes it different this time and how best to tell that story, sharing experiences of reporting from the NHS frontline.

17.30

Drinks reception

19.15

Conference dinner

 

Conference dinner

7.15pm - Hall 11

Rachel Clarke, NHS doctor, author and NHS campaigner, joined us as our after dinner speaker on day one. Rachel discussed the power of stories in medicine, focussing on the patient narrative and her own experience of delivering care on the frontline.


07.30

Registration and exhibition

08.00

Breakfast session

 

General Medical Council: Doctor Who?

8:00am - Hall 10

You spend the majority of your budget on your medical workforce. But do you know: if you have workforce gaps? How your doctors are assured? What doctors say about quality and safety in your trust? Are they practising within the law? The GMC helped answer these questions. 

 

NHS England: Leading an NHS provider in a joined-up health and care system: what are the opportunities and challenges?

8:00am - Hall 9

New forms of collaboration such as STPs and accountable care systems are changing the role of leadership in the NHS. This session considered what this means for senior leaders at different types of NHS provider trust. Discussion covered: 

  • essential ingredients and success factors for whole-system leadership
  • the main challenges facing new system leaders, and how they can be overcome
  • how regulators can help foster partnership between organisations and encourage the spread of good practice across the country

09.15

Plenary sessions

 

Keynote address from the Secretary of State

9:20am - Hall 1

The secretary of state reflected on the service’s current performance, the pressures it faces, how it is changing to meet today’s patient needs, and what the government can and is doing to help.

Simon Stevens: The NHS at 70 - progress and prospects?

10:00am - Hall 1

As the NHS squares up to a challenging winter, operational pressures and a big service re-design agenda; the chief executive of NHS England set out key milestones that he encountered along the way, and what their big decisions for the year ahead is. 

 

Resources

The NHS at 70.pdf

10.45

Exhibition, refreshments and networking

11.15

Breakout sessions

 

Driving efficiency through an innovative digital partnership

11:15am - Hall 10

Innovation is critical in enabling healthcare providers across the world, transform and deliver services fit for patients in the twenty first century. The NHS has not always been receptive to change, but new and pioneering commercial partnerships between providers and technology entrepreneurs, are changing the way healthcare is delivered in the UK. This session focused on the collaboration between the NHS and the commercial sector on implementing innovate solutions, to drive efficiency and ensure financial sustainability within the provider sector.

This session was part of the money strand

Why the NHS must focus on suicide prevention

11:15am - Hall 9

The impact of a suicide ricochets through families, communities and places, is a heavy burden on healthcare services and resources. Yet many suicides are preventable: this is the message, backed with mounting evidence from 'Zero Suicide' programmes, introduced in the UK and overseas. This session explored work underway, both within NHS secondary services and local systems, towards improving suicide prevention. Delegates heard a first-hand account of why this must be a priority for all providers across the full spectrum of NHS care.

This session was part of the quality strand

Developing future leaders across the healthcare sector

11:15am - Hall 11a

The unprecedented scale of the challenges facing NHS leaders, managers and staff, has drawn renewed focus on talent management. This session focused on building leadership capacity and capability to ensure the NHS has a future leadership pipeline, supplying the right number of diverse, appropriately skilled people. Delegates were able to find out what the NHS is doing to support talent management across the health system, as well as learning about successful talent management programmes in other sectors.

This session was part of the workforce strand

12.25

Exhibition, lunch and networking

 

Drop in session with Newton

Hearts, minds, and powerful practicalities: making change happen – and stick!

Over the last 8 years Newton’s Health team has been deeply immersed in change projects, in trusts of every shape and size, up and down the country. Making large scale change happen, and stick, is a challenge. So, in the spirit of sharing what we’ve learned and stimulating discussion, we are facilitating an intensive masterclass around the realities of not only driving change, but making sure the new approaches survive and thrive despite the complexities of the healthcare environment.

We’re pleased to announce that we will be running two of these informal but intensive sessions at NHS Providers – in addition to our programmed workshop on ‘Practical actions to reduce delayed transfers of care in the north of England’ on Tuesday 7th at 12pm.

So – join us at 12.25 on Wed 8 November on the balcony in the exhibition hall.

 

Sponsor/partner

ACE17-web-logos-newton-X.jpg

13.25

Breakout sessions

 

The Carter review community and mental health journey

1:25pm - Hall 10

NHS Improvement, in partnership with several community and mental health providers, has been undertaking work to expand the Carter review into the non-acute sectors. Once again, the review has focused on improving productivity and efficiency. Working with a cohort of trusts, NHS Improvement has sought to identify cases of best practice and hopes to share a series of emerging findings in due course. This session looked at the thoughts and reflections of those involved in the review from both a provider and regulator perspective.

This session was part of the money strand

Creating a coherent and credible national workforce strategy

:25pm - Hall 11a

The growing set of workforce challenges facing the NHS has exposed how responsibility for workforce strategy is fragmented across several different national organisations, with no effective mechanism for delivering a coherent and credible approach. This session looked at what the national bodies need to do, to support the provider sector to recruit and retain the right staff with the right skills and values, both now and in the future.

This session was part of the workforce strand

14.35

Exhibition, refreshments and networking

15.05

Plenary sessions

 

The future of mental health services

3:05pm - Hall 1

Claire Murdoch gave a keynote address on the five year forward view for mental health, her ambitions for the sector and what other providers can learn from mental health services. This was followed by a discussion with our panellists who offered their experience and perspectives on the progress and challenges of delivering mental health services in such a pressurised environment. 

Just culture: the pathway to greater trust at your trust

3:50pm - Hall 1

What are the markers of 'just culture' in the NHS? Can NHS provider chief executives lead with compassion and candour at a time when the central bodies, exerting the greatest pressure and scrutiny in the service's history, act in ways counter to the fairness, transparency and compassion they expect of provider boards? Can we really turn the tide of blame and retribution for 'failure' towards true accountability that acknowledges suffering, prioritises learning, and delivers change? Internationally-respected safety expert, Professor Sidney Dekker, explored these questions.  

16.45

Conference close

The conference dinner was held on 7 November and enabled attendees to explore the conference themes in a more informal environment and hear from after dinner speaker, Dr Rachel Clarke, author of The Sunday Times best-selling book, Your life in my hands.

 

Speakers

Dr Rachel Clarke
Dr Rachel Clarke

NHS doctor, author and NHS campaigner

 
Before training as a doctor, Rachel was a television journalist, producing and directing current affairs documentaries. When Jeremy Hunt sought to impose a new contract upon junior doctors last year, she was at the forefront of their campaign against the government. Her Sunday Times best-selling book, Your Life in My Hands, reveals what life is really like on an overstretched NHS frontline.
Sidney Dekker
Sidney Dekker

Professor, School of Humanities

Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia

 
Sidney Dekker is a professor at Griffith University in Brisbane, where he runs the Safety Science Innovation Lab. Previously, he was professor of human factors and system safety at Lund University in Sweden. He has won worldwide acclaim for his ground-breaking work in human factors and safety. He is a best-selling author and his debut documentary Safety Differently was released in September 2017.
Sarah Dugan
Sarah Dugan

Chief Executive

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust

 
Sarah is chief executive of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust and chief executive lead for the Herefordshire and Worcestershire sustainability and transformation partnership.

Sarah is a registered general nurse, and has held a wide range of senior positions within provider and commissioning organisations. She has a particular interest in partnership working, integration and the development of positive learning cultures.
Chris Hopson
Chris Hopson

Chief Executive

 
Chris joined NHS Providers as chief executive in September 2012 after a career in politics, commercial television and the civil service.

Chris leads the organisation, with a particular emphasis on setting strategy, senior stakeholder management, acting as the principal public voice of the organisation and representing the provider sector on a range of NHS system level committees.
Nick Hulme
Nick Hulme

Chief Executive

Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust

 
Nick has worked in the NHS for more than 30 years. He successfully brought together community and hospital based care in his previous role as chief executive of Croydon Health Services NHS Trust. As chief executive of Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust, he leads the Sustainability and transformation plan for east and west Suffolk and north east Essex.
Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt MP
Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt MP

Secretary of state for health

 
Jeremy has been a Conservative Member of Parliament for South West Surrey since May 2005. He was re-elected in 2017, with a majority of 21,590.

In September 2012 Jeremy was appointed as secretary of state for health. Prior to this he was appointed secretary of state for culture, olympics, media and sport in May 2010 during which time he oversaw a successful Olympic and Paralympic Games in London in the summer of 2012. He had shadowed this brief in opposition since July 2007.

Born on 1 November 1966, Mr Hunt was educated at Charterhouse school, Godalming and Oxford University. He lives in Godalming and London with his wife Lucia and their three young children.
Graham Jackson
Graham Jackson

Chair

NHS Clinical Commissioners

 
Graham founded and acted as the medical manager of AYDDOC, an out-of-hours GP co-operative. He has spent 10 years as a hospital practitioner in psychiatry and was managing director of Buckinghamshire Urgent Care. He is currently a member of the GP forward view oversight group and is vice-chair of Buckinghamshire health and wellbeing board.
Dr Paul Lelliott
Dr Paul Lelliott

Deputy Chief Inspector (Mental Health)

Care Quality Commission

 
Before joining CQC, Paul spent 20 years working as a consultant psychiatrist at Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust. In 2014, he was appointed deputy chief inspector of hospitals, leading on mental health.
Jim Mackey
Jim Mackey

Chief Executive

NHS Improvement

 
Jim became chief executive of NHS Improvement on 1 November 2015. He is a qualified accountant who joined the NHS in 1990. His previous roles have included chief executive of Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, interim chief executive of Northumberland Care Trust, as well as a range of director roles across NHS organisations. He has a keen interest in quality of care, especially patient and family experience, and has participated in a number of reviews and national projects, including the Dalton Review in 2014.
Alastair McLellan
Alastair McLellan

Editor

HSJ

 
Alastair McLellan has been the editor of HSJ – the UK’s leading intelligence service for healthcare leaders – since 2002 (with a short break between 2007 and 2010).

HSJ has been named the UK’s number one ‘business information brand’ in two of the last three years. It has also won ‘launch of the year’ twice in the same period: in 2015 for the strategic targeting and insight tool HSJ intelligence; and in 2017 for HSJ Solutions – the largest database of validated NHS best practice.

A journalist since 1986 – Alastair covered both the first Gulf War and the Hong Kong handover before joining HSJ.
He has a long parallel career as a sportswriter. In 2010, his book 500-1 - about the 1981 Headingley Ashes Test - was named as one of the sports books of the year by the Independent.
Sarah Montague
Sarah Montague

Broadcast journalist

 
Sarah is one of the main anchors on Radio 4’s flagship Today Programme and presents HARDtalk on BBC World Television. In nearly 20 years at the BBC she has presented many of its news programmes from bulletins to Newsnight and BBC Breakfast. She was also one of the very first anchors on the BBC’s rolling News Channel. She has presented two series of “The Educators” for BBC Radio 4 and, in 2014, the hugely popular “My Teacher is an App” which explored the phenomenal changes in education being brought about by technology.

Sarah studied biology at Bristol University, before beginning a career in finance with Natwest. At the age of 24 she made the leap into journalism, first working as a reporter and presenter at Channel Television in Guernsey and Jersey.

In 1994 she moved to London as a freelance TV news reporter. After joining the staff of Reuters she moved to Sky News, before heading to the BBC in 1997.
Claire Murdoch
Claire Murdoch

National Mental Health Director

NHS England

 
Claire Murdoch, national mental health director for NHS England, is a registered mental health nurse for 34 years, and joined NHS England in April 2016. She is also chief executive of Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust.

With a wealth of clinical and leadership experience she is leading delivering the national mental health programme for NHS England.
Gabrielle Nash
Gabrielle Nash

Producer

ITV

 
Gabrielle has been a journalist for ITV News for over 10 years, the latter 5 years predominantly specialising in health and science. She has covered a range of stories in the NHS, mental health and obesity. She has jointly won two awards from the Medical Journalist Association and from the Royal Television Society for an investigation with Chris Choi.
Chris Smyth
Chris Smyth

Health Editor

The Times

 
Chris has been health correspondent for The Times since 2010, and has written on: health policy, medicine, science, culture and politics. Previously, he has been a news reporter, letters editor and obituary writer, and has worked in the Brussels bureau of the Financial Times.

Chris has also written the novel, Dinner at mine, and has co-written an evidence-based guide to quit smoking, The Smokefree formula.
Simon Stevens
Simon Stevens

Chief executive

NHS England

 
Simon joined the NHS through its graduate training scheme. He is now chief executive of NHS England and has subsequently led acute hospitals, mental health and community services, primary care and health commissioning. He served seven years as the Prime Minister’s health adviser, and as policy adviser to successive health secretaries at the Department of Health.
Polly Toynbee
Polly Toynbee

Columnist

Guardian

 
Polly Toynbee is a columnist for the Guardian and she was formerly social affairs editor for the BBC. She has written books on the NHS, adoption, unskilled work and inequality. Her most recent book is co-written with David Walker and is called, Dismembered: how the attack on the state harms us all.
Melanie Walker
Melanie Walker

Chief Executive

Devon Partnership NHS Trust

 
Melanie is an experienced chief executive who has worked at all levels and settings in the NHS, with a strong history of leading transformation and turnaround in both health and social care. Previous roles include chief executive of Princess Alexandra Hospital and deputy chief executive of South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust.
Martin Campbell
Martin Campbell

Head of pricing

NHS England

 
Martin has held a number of senior finance roles in NHS England and the Department of Health. Starting as an analyst, Martin led the Department of Health’s team that coordinated the spending review bids for the NHS and adult social care. As head of pricing in NHS England, he leads on responsibilities for the National Tariff, working alongside NHS Improvement.
Shane Carmichael
Shane Carmichael

Assistant Director, Strategy and Communication

General Medical Council

 
Shane joined the GMC from Accenture in 2012. He is responsible for the GMC’s relationships with the four UK governments and oversees their devolved offices in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Shane also leads the teams responsible for engagement with the UK and EU parliaments, as well as devolved legislatures and the GMC’s regional liaison service.
Lara Carmona
Lara Carmona

Associate Director - Policy and Public Affairs

Royal College of Nursing

 
As associate director for policy and public affairs, Lara is responsible for policy development and influencing within the UK and internationally, on behalf of the 430,000 members of the College.

For the last 15 years, Lara has worked in policy development and implementation in healthcare, with a strong focus on grassroots mobilisation alongside political influencing.
Tista Chakravarty-Gannon
Tista Chakravarty-Gannon

Principal Regional Liaison Adviser

General Medical Council

 
Tista is a principal regional liaison adviser at the GMC, where she leads a team and delivers workshops on ethical standards for doctors.

Tista spent many years in stakeholder management, working with survivors of abuse, particularly in children’s and mental health support services. More recently, she has worked on projects with the Gold Standards Framework, Marie Curie and Royal College of General Practitioners.
Anita Charlesworth
Anita Charlesworth

Director of Research and Economics

The Health Foundation

 
Anita Charlesworth is the director of research and economics at the Health Foundation, and honorary professor in the College of Social Sciences at the Health Services Management Centre (HSMC) at the University of Birmingham.

Previously Anita was chief economist at the Nuffield Trust, chief analyst and chief scientific advisor at DCMS, and director of public spending at the Treasury. She was awarded a CBE in The Queen's 2017 Birthday Honours List for services to economics and health policy.
Keith Conradi
Keith Conradi

Chief investigator

Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch

 
Keith is a professional pilot, operating a wide range of military fast jet and civil aircraft for the Royal Air Force and subsequently Virgin Atlantic. He joined the Air Accidents Investigation Branch as an operations inspector, later becoming chief inspector. He is now chief investigator of the UK’s newly formed Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch.
Saffron Cordery
Saffron Cordery

Director of Policy and Strategy and Deputy Chief Executive

NHS Providers

 
Saffron is our director of policy and strategy, is a member of the senior management team, and sits on our board.

She has extensive experience in policy development, influencing and communications and has worked in the healthcare sector since 2007. Before moving into healthcare, Saffron was head of public affairs at the Local Government Association, the voice of local councils in England. Her early career focused on influencing EU legislation and policy development, and she started working life in adult and community education.

She has a degree in Modern Languages from the University in Manchester and is the chair of the corporation of a 16–19 college in Hampshire.
Stephen Dalton
Stephen Dalton

Non-Executive Director

Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust

 
Stephen is known nationally for his work as chief executive of the NHS Confederation and its mental health network, which built on 17 years previous experience as trust chief executive. He started his NHS career as a general nurse, followed by a period of working in mental health services, before assuming a series of clinical leadership roles including director of nursing.
Paul Davis
Paul Davis

National Investigator

Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch

 
Prior to Paul’s current role as national investigator, he had a career in aviation: flying commercial airliners and as a helicopter instructor in the military. He also served as a senior investigator, helping to establishment the military air accident investigation branch. For the last two years, Paul has been investigating the potential to reduce admissions of ‘full-term’ babies to neonatal units.
Sue Davis
Sue Davis

Chair

Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust

 
Sue is chair of Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, previously serving as chair for Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust.
Sue has also represented mental health trusts as vice chair on the board of NHS Providers. She has also chaired for Telford and Wrekin Primary Care Trust for its first four years.
Emma Dawes
Emma Dawes

Chief matron for nursing and midwifery education programmes

Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

 
As chief matron for nursing and midwifery education programmes at Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, Emma has over 20 years’ experience as a nurse in the NHS. Having worked in a variety of clinical roles, she settled in the field of practice, development and education in 2005. Emma is committed to improving care through high-quality student education and on-going staff development.
Christian Dingwall
Christian Dingwall

Partner

Hempsons

 
Christian advises a range of NHS and other health clients on governance, regulatory matters and transactions. Christian has over 30 years’ experience in the health sector and is currently working on STPs and their health and social care partners, to set up new care models. He regularly speaks on STPs and accountable care governance for integrating in and out of hospital health and social care services.
Monique Duffy-Brogan
Monique Duffy-Brogan

Chief pricing officer

NHS Improvement

 
Monique joined the NHS as head of planning and IT at the Countess of Chester Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, where she worked on the national programme for IT and delivering efficiency through process innovation and use of technology at various trusts.

As chief pricing officer at NHS Improvement, Monique leads on developing and implementing payment and costing systems, including the national tariff and patient-level information and costing systems.
Luke Edwards
Luke Edwards

Director of Sector Development

NHS Improvement

 
Luke has worked in public services for over 15 years, including immigration, policing, and most recently in the NHS. Luke now works for NHS Improvement as part of the operational productivity directorate, leading the work to extend the efficiency reviews into all provider sectors.
Cathy Ellis
Cathy Ellis

Chairman

Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust

 
Cathy is chairman of Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust (LPT), which provides mental health, learning disability and community services.

LPT has a strategic relationship with the University of Leicester where Cathy is a member of the council and finance committee. Prior to this she was chairman of the Leicester, Leicestershire & Rutland NHS Primary Care Trust.

Cathy trained as a chartered accountant with Price Waterhouse and subsequently gained commercial experience at Molson Coors in finance, strategic planning, procurement and human resources.
Navina has over 20 years’ clinical experience in psychiatry, medicine and paediatrics. Navina has been deputy chief executive and director of operations at the East London NHS Foundation Trust (ELFT), before being appointed as chief executive in 2016. Navina previously worked as clinical director for the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services at ELFT, and had lead responsibility for partnerships and integrated care.
Mike Farrar
Mike Farrar

Partner

Hempsons

 
Mike was previously chief executive of NHS Confederation, where he successfully chaired the team that negotiated the new general medical service contract. He was also chief executive of west and south Yorkshire strategic health authorities. While being head of primary care at the Department of Health, he was responsible for establishing primary care groups and trusts.
Dean Fathers
Dean Fathers

Chair

Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

 
Dean stepped into his current role as chair in 2011, having formerly been a stakeholder governor at the trust. He has previously chaired NHS Bassetlaw CCG and was a non-executive director on the board of the South Yorkshire strategic health authority. Dean was also vice chair of the NHS Confederation’s mental health network and has held roles on two NHS workforce development boards. He has also held advisory roles on the NHS’ culture advisory group.
Martin Hancock
Martin Hancock

NHS national head of talent management

NHS Leadership academy

 
Martin joined the NHS in 2012 after 15 years in the commercial executive search sector. Martin has been part of the NHS Leadership Academy since launching in 2012. He is a senior member of the team that created the national improvement and leadership development strategic framework, Developing People – Improving Care which was published in December 2016. Since then, he has been responsible for implementing a more comprehensive and coherent approach to talent management for the NHS. He was also appointed to the new post of NHS national head of talent management in March 2017.
Chris Hart
Chris Hart

Commercial director

East Midlands Academic Health Science Network

 
As commercial director, Chris brings NHS organisations, universities and industry, together to drive innovations and tackle major health issues. He delivers efficiency gains across the health and social care system and builds closer links between healthcare and businesses, to deliver innovation exchange programmes and to identify innovative commercial products and services.
Sandy Lewis
Sandy Lewis

National Investigator

Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch

 
Sandy has a clinical background as a trained nurse specialising in intensive care. She has worked within the NHS for over 20 years, with experience in both district general hospitals and the teaching hospital environment. Prior to Sandy’s current role, she worked as an associate chief nurse and head of patient safety.
David Loughton
David Loughton

Chief executive

The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust

 
David was formerly chief executive of University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, he successfully lead the organisation through two hospital mergers and developed with Warwick University, a new medical school.

As chief executive of The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust, he has aided the development of the radio frequency identification (RFID) technology system, used for tracking staff and patients.
Michael Macdonnell
Michael Macdonnell

National Director of Health System Transformation

NHS England

 
Before Michael became national director of health system transformation at NHS England, he was director of strategy at the trust. While acting as director of strategy, Michael helped develop the NHS five year forward view by leading a team responsible for driving the implementation of its core commitments. Before that, Michael was an advisor at the Prime Minister's Delivery Unit under Tony Blair.
Steve Mallen
Steve Mallen

Chair

The MindEd Trust

 
Steve is chair of The MindEd Trust, a charity formed to assist young people with mental health issues. Steve has extensive knowledge and experience in mental illness prevention, early intervention and mental health education. Professionally, Steve has 30 years’ experience in research, forecasting and management consulting. He is a member of the national suicide prevention group within the Department of Health.
Neil Mortimer
Neil Mortimer

Business manager

West Midlands Academic Health Science Network

 
Neil advises and supports industry, NHS organisations and academic partners in scaling up the adoption of innovations to improve health and generate economic benefits. He is also a lead in digital and mental health. Formerly, Neil was a primary care chief executive officer and led a number programmes with an emphasis on digitally enabled transformation.
Mel Pickup
Mel Pickup

Chief Executive

Warrington and Halton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

 
Mel was appointed as chief executive of Warrington and Halton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in 2011, having previously served as chief executive at The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust.

Mel is currently chair of the north-west’s regional emerging leaders group and she oversees the NHS graduate management training scheme across the north-west. She is also the lead for the Cheshire and Merseyside sustainability and transformation plan.
Chris Powell-Wiffen
Chris Powell-Wiffen

Deputy Chief Operating Officer

Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

 
Chris has spent almost 20 years working within the acute provider environment, across surgical and operating, diagnostic and critical care specialties. As deputy chief operating officer, Chris focuses on non-elective pathways, with a recent emphasis on delayed transfers of care.
Joe Rafferty
Joe Rafferty

Chief Executive

Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust

 
Before joining the NHS, Joe had a successful career in cancer research, publishing over 50 peer-reviewed publications. Prior to becoming chief executive of Mersey Care NHS Trust in 2012, Joe was director of commissioning support at the NHS Commissioning Board.

He was recently named number nine in HSJ’s, top 50 chief executives awards list and included in the HSJ’s list of 100 most influential people in health. Joe has also been championing Expert by Experience as a major driver for transformation.
Andrew Ridley
Andrew Ridley

Chief executive

Central London Community Healthcare NHS Trust

 
Prior to becoming chief executive of Central London Community Healthcare Trust, Andrew was regional director for NHS England. While previously working as managing director for North East London Commissioning Support Unit, he was seconded to programme director for the Better Care Fund, which focused on developing local areas for integrating care. He held a variety of senior positions in NHS Tower Hamlets CCG, including director of primary care.
Adam Roberts
Adam Roberts

Head of Economics

The Health Foundation

 
Adam Roberts is the head of economics at the Health Foundation, leading a team to provide independent analysis on the current and future pressures facing the NHS and care system in the UK. Before joining the Health Foundation he worked at the Nuffield Trust, Care Quality Commission and Dorset Healthcare University Foundation Trust.

Adam graduated from Keele University in 2004 with a first class dual honours degree in statistics and economics.
John Short
John Short

Chief Executive

Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust

 
John has been chief executive since 2013. He has worked towards improving staff, service user and carer engagement, demonstrating a trust-wide focus on service quality.

He began his career as a mental health social worker before moving onto mental health services management in the NHS. His previous roles include director of mental health and learning disability services, chief operating officer at Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust and interim chief executive of Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust.
Jenny Simpson
Jenny Simpson

Independent Consultant

Better Medical Management

 
Jenny created the British Association of Medical Managers and was its chief executive for 20 years. She was also President of the Institute of Healthcare Managers.

Jenny has also worked on a review of medical regulation and chaired an implementation stream. She has also led parts of the work on regulatory reform for doctors, working with teams within the Department of Health and NHS England.
Rob Smith
Rob Smith

Director of Strategy and Planning

Health Education England

 
Rob has over 30 years’ service with the NHS. He joined Health Education England’s national team as head of planning, working on the first workplace plan for England. He was then promoted to director of strategy and planning, before culminating in the role as director of workforce planning and intelligence.
Sue Smith
Sue Smith

Executive chief nurse

University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust

 
Sue has been chief nurse for nearly 10 years. She was part of the national team that developed the safer nursing care tool and continues to be engaged in national workforce strategy. Sue is a founding director of Transform Healthcare Cambodia and was appointed chair of NHS Providers' national nursing directors network.
Richard Stubbs
Richard Stubbs

Chief executive officer

Yorkshire & Humber Academic Health Science Network

 
Richard leads the Yorkshire and Humber Academic Health Social Network, connecting NHS, academia and industry to facilitate change across whole health and social care economies, and focusing on increasing economic growth and improving patient outcomes. Prior to this, Richard was the organisation’s commercial director, providing executive leadership on all commercial, innovation and wealth creation objectives.
Sonia Swart
Sonia Swart

Chief Executive

Northampton General Hospital NHS Trust

 
Sonia was appointed as chief executive in 2013, having been the trust's medical director since 2007. Sonia went on to train in general medicine and clinical haematology, working as a consultant haematologist before joining Northampton General Hospital NHS Trust. Prior to becoming medical director, Sonia has been head of pathology, clinical director for diagnostics and clinical lead for the foundation trust application.
Adrian Tams
Adrian Tams

Head of Workforce Planning & Recruitment

Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

 
Adrian worked in the private sector for 15 years, culminating in the role of group head of talent for a national organisation. He joined Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust in 2016 as recruitment and retention lead, subsequently being promoted to head of workforce planning and recruitment in 2017.

Prior to this, Adrian spent three years as a post-doctoral academic and in a senior management role in talent management.
Rich Taunt
Rich Taunt

Founder of Kaleidoscope Health & Care

Kaleidoscope Health and Care

 
Rich has significant experience across health care change, regulation, government and policy making. He has held senior roles in the Department of Health, Care Quality Commission and the Health Foundation.

He is the founder of Kaleidoscope Health & Care, a social enterprise which finds new ways to overcome old barriers to improve health and care.
Andrew Taylor
Andrew Taylor

Partner

Aldwych Partners

 
Andrew is a partner at Aldwych Partners, a consultancy that advises on mergers and competition in the NHS and broader health and care sector. Prior to co-founding Aldwych Partners, Andrew was senior director of inquiries at the competition commission. He has also worked as director of the NHS Cooperation and Competition Panel.
Mark Temple
Mark Temple

Future Hospital Project Officer

Royal College of Physicians

 
Mark is a consultant physician and nephrologist at the Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Mark has led innovation of acute medical services as clinical and associate medical director.

Mark commissioned and edited the acute-care toolkit series and chaired the hospital pathways work-stream of the Future hospital commission at the Royal College of Physicians. He was subsequently appointed future hospital officer, co-editing the digital issues of the future healthcare journal.
Hardev Virdee
Hardev Virdee

Chief financial officer

Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust

 
Hardev started his career in the NHS as part of the national finance graduate scheme. He went onto work at a strategic health authority, before becoming director of finance at Hounslow Primary Care Trust. His most recent role was chief financial officer at a CCG were he also led on reducing health inequalities. Now working at Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust, he has seen how teams such as finance support staff delivery.
Amy Webster
Amy Webster

Chief registrar and haematology trainee

Northampton General Hospital NHS Trust

 
Amy is currently a final year trainee in clinical haematology, based in Leicester. During her higher specialist training, Amy commenced an out-of-programme experience in leadership and management. Through this, she became a chief registrar in the pilot scheme run by the Royal College of Physicians, which is aimed at developing future clinical leaders.
Ric Whalley
Ric Whalley

Associate Director

Newton Europe

 
Ric leads Newton’s work in the acute sector, with strong ties to wider health and social care. His recent experience includes leading a national investigation with the Local Government Authority (LGA) on efficiency opportunities through integration. He has also led on a programme with both NHS England and the LGA to improve delayed transfers of care across the north of England.

Partners

Hempsons
 

Event partner

Hempsons is a full service law firm for the NHS. We advise on a range of strategic and operational issues. We are currently working with clients on: accountable care, collaborations, STPs, service reconfigurations, workforce planning and estates and infrastructure projects. For more information please visit www.hempsons.co.uk or follow us on @hempsonslegal

Newton
 

Event partner

We work with public organisations to crack some of the sector’s biggest challenges. Our clients are not only saving millions of pounds a year: one is also seeing nearly 6,000 more patients in clinics, and another has released 150 days of operating time from improved turnarounds. Helping organisations meet their financial targets while improving the lives of their patients, matters to us.

For more information, please visit www.newtoneurope.com or follow us on @Newton_Europe

HSJ
 

Media supporter

HSJ provides critical information and insight to senior management and decision-makers in the NHS and to the healthcare industry. HSJ’s flagship digital information product is the premier source of proprietary content, insight, comment and analysis on the UK healthcare sector and is sold via individual and corporate subscriptions. For more information please visit https://www.hsj.co.uk or follow us on @HSJnews

 

Supporters

Allocate Software
 

Strand supporter - Workforce

Allocate is the leading provider of workforce software to the NHS. Allocate focuses on technology that improves retention, reduces agency reliance and protects care. For more information please visit www.allocatesoftware.co.uk or follow us on @AllocateS

EY
 

Seating area supporter

EY are dedicated to helping healthcare systems through the unprecedented challenges they are currently facing. We work with clients to realise long-term goals and we have extensive experience, insight and the technical ability to provide the best solutions.

Our core team has a wealth of hands-on experience and includes a number of ex-clinicians. Our teams work together to offer skill and knowledge, bringing energy and innovation to help effect change.

For more information, visit www.ey.com and follow us on @EY_Healthcare

General Medical Council
 

Breakfast session supporter

You spend the majority of your budget on your medical workforce. But do you know: if you have workforce gaps? How your doctors are assured? What doctors say about quality and safety in your Trust? Don’t miss the GMC breakfast session on 8 November – we’ll help you answer these questions.

For more information, visit: www.gmc-uk.org or follow us on @gmcuk

 

NHS England
 

Breakfast session supporter

NHS England leads the National Health Service in England. We set the priorities and direction of the NHS and encourage and inform the national debate to improve health and care. With our partners in health, we devised the strategic vision for the NHS five year forward view, and now again with our partners, we are delivering that vision.

We want everyone to have greater control of their health and wellbeing, and to be supported to live longer and healthier lives by delivering high-quality health and care services that are compassionate, inclusive and constantly improving.

For more information, visit: www.england.nhs.uk or follow us on @NHSEngland

Exhibition

The conference exhibition provided an opportunity for delegates to meet with a range of partners and suppliers that can help them to meet key organisational challenges.

Attendees also heard about pioneering work from trusts across the sector in our Provider showcase

Exhibition floorplan

 
Stand 10

Allocate Software

Stand 27A

Board Intelligence

Stand 24

British Heart Foundation

Stand 21

Browne Jacobson LLP

Stand 23

Capsticks LLP

Stand 14B

Dearden HR

Stand 8

Defence Medical Services

Stand 12

ERS Group

Stand 5

Finegreen Group

Stand 9

Guardian Jobs

Stand 19

Health Education England

Stand 31

Healthcare Safety Investigations Branch (HSIB)

Stand 20

Hempsons

Stand 26

Hill Dickinson LLP

Stand 28

HSJ

Stand 13

Hunter Healthcare Resourcing Limited

Stand 3

ICSA

Stand 22

IICSA: Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse

Stand 14A

Kingsgate

Stand 6

Newton

Stand 2

NHS Confederation

Stand 7

NHS Improvement

NHS Providers

Stand 25

NHS Retirement Fellowship

Stand 16

PwC

Stand 4

Questback

Stand 11

Ward Hadaway

Provider showcase

The Provider showcase at our annual conference and exhibition was an opportunity for our member trusts to share their good practice with senior leaders from across the provider sector.

12 organisations showcased some of their pioneering work that helps them innovate and improve their services.

All roads lead to Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

In 2015-2016, Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (LPFT) faced an unprecedented level of vacant nurse posts with a rate of 16%.

LPFT created a recruitment task and finish group with the aim of raising the profile of the trust as a great place to work, while promoting Lincolnshire as a great place to live to improve recruitment and retention rates and staff wellbeing.

The group, composed of managers and nursing staff, carried out a number of initiatives. They appointed a recruitment and retention lead in July 2016, who brought ideas and experience from the private sector. Engaging marketing materials were developed and used across social media. They also established relationships with universities to attend career fairs and talks with nursing and medical students.

Internally, the team reviewed and modified the recruitment process to reduce time between offer and contract. They also reviewed the benefits package for the workforce to attract new talent as well as developing existing staff.

In nine months, the trust has seen success in a number of outcomes: the nurse vacancy rate has reduced from 14.2% to 1.8%, staff survey results have improved with the trust now ranked in the top three most improved mental health trusts, and the recruitment timeline has decreased by 26 days.

Cancer survivorship: a model for holistic assessment

Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust

The Suffolk survivorship project is a pioneering programme developed to integrate a complete package of holistic care, support and resources into current services. This is an integral part of the patient pathway for all individuals living with, and beyond cancer. This service encompasses the whole patient pathway, from diagnosis to end of life. This project delivers a model of care in partnership with a wide range of professionals and services: from primary, secondary and private sector, national and local charities, cancer service user groups and commissioning groups.

Developing and embedding the survivorship project in the patient pathway required engaging a number of key stakeholders to get them on board. Given the funding constraints, they established a charitable fund to support delivery of their support initiatives. The survivorship delivered regular audit reports, training and updates to all key clinical and network meetings. This ensures progress and support for the project, as well as promoting education and shared understanding. They contributed to the trusts cancer strategy as well as being a key member of the network survivorship community of practice meetings, and the local cancer alliance. By 2020, one nurse in every GP practice will have undergone this training and will be a link nurse to secondary care.

Collaborating not competing: the EMRAD consortium journey

Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust

The East Midlands Radiology (EMRAD) consortium is a collaborative consortium of eight trusts, 15 hospital sites, covering six sustainability and transformation partnership footprints, 6 million patients, and over 1,000 staff. 

Together as eight trusts, they have created a fully shared imaging patient record, containing 1.6 billion images and growing.

They have developed an innovative and sustainable model for special collaboration between trusts in the interests of patient care, which is now proven to work.  

The model is already scaling into other radiology services in the UK, and could be used in other pathways of care too.

The journey has been challenging. They have pushed at the edges of what is technically possible in the UK healthcare system. Overall, the trusts have experienced a shared and enduring journey, bringing clinicians and other professionals together from different trusts, leading to the creation of new partnerships. While there have been significant pain points, these have tightened bonds within the consortium. Despite the significant financial, operational and capacity/demand constraints in the current NHS environment, they are achieving a significant cultural shift from isolation and competitiveness to open collaboration and cooperation.   

Earn as you learn student paramedic programme

West Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust

With the ever-increasing demand on ambulance services, there is a requirement to have a reliable and robust workforce supply model which ensures patients receive the right care, at the right time, in the right place. West Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (WMAS) also aims to have a workforce that reflects the communities it serves. Traditionally, people contacting the recruitment team came from a variety of backgrounds and professions, including other healthcare professionals. Recognising the majority of these people were unable to undertake full-time education due to family commitments or financial constraints, the trust launched the Earn as you learn student paramedic programme, providing an alternative pathway into the profession.

The programme, led by a multi-directorate team, has recruited over 1200 student paramedics. The programme demonstrates excellent partnership working with higher education institutions. The programme team have built a strong social media presence, developing their work to be more reflective of the communities they serve, while their service team developed a recruitment DVD and was commissioned by Health Education England, specifically focused on paramedics who are of black and minority ethnicity in the trust. The DVD has been used by other ambulance services.

The implementation of the student paramedic role within WMAS has enabled the trust to better meet demand, given that the trust is the only ambulance service with no frontline vacancies. The recruitment of local people offers their workforce a better working knowledge of the area and a better understanding of the difficulties faced within certain communities. The programme is renowned across the country, further emphasised by an employee achieving the accolade from the Association of Ambulance Chief Executives’ student paramedic of the year.

Emergency admission avoidance pathways

Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust

Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust is an integrated acute and community organisation, working in collaboration with partners to ensure that Walsall’s health economy is fit for purpose and sustainable, and able to meet the challenge facing their health and social care systems. Walsall’s integrated health and social care model aims to significantly improve the overall health and wellbeing of their local population.

The trust has developed a number of initiatives with the overall aim of moving care closer to home and reducing issues created by an increasing capacity, which emergency and acute services are facing. These include: integrated health and social ‘place-based teams’, targeted case management, workforce modelling around local need, rapid response, multi-disciplinary team and a nursing home case management service which has seen a significant reduction in ambulance service calls and transfers to hospitals. The trust has also developed a community ‘virtual ward’ which provides immediate information to community leads, if a patient has been admitted into hospital.

The targeted case management initiative has been progressing since 2014, resulting in 447 ‘frequent admission’ patients being on community case loads experiencing no readmissions in the last 12 months.

Ethnic minority network

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

The aims of the ethnic minority network at North East London NHS Foundation Trust (NELFT) is to build a comprehensive means of supporting black, asian, and minority ethnic staff to break the glass ceiling effect, and have staff of ethnic minority in senior positions within the organisation. The network provides a platform for sharing ideas and experiences, exploring ways of bringing the shared issues, problems or recommendations, to the senior management of the trust so that both groups can work in partnership. The network encourages links with groups within NELFT as well as other national networks. 

The network pioneered the development of black, minority and ethnic ambassador for the executive management team and the local integrated care director posts, to collaboratively work with both white and non-white managers to reduce the number of disciplinary, harassment and bullying cases. The network helped to develop and implement the ethnic minority strategy in order to support the career development and progression of ethnic minority staff within NELFT. The outcomes have been demonstrated in staff survey results for the workforce, race and equality standard: they received national recognition for their ground-breaking work to promote inclusion and opportunities for ethic minority staff at the 2015 All Inclusive awards. They went on to win the employee race, ethnic and cultural heritage network of the year and in 2017, the work of the network led to the trust winning the employee network group’s public sector award, at the employer’s network for equality and inclusion awards ceremony in London.

In March 2016, the chief executive of NHS England, Simon Stevens, visited the trust and his remarks were “when it comes to inclusiveness and how this can be done, I now say – visit NELFT”.

Learning from and with each other in mental health services

Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust

Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust’s ambition is centred on improving clinical pathways and striving to be responsive, consistent, caring and accessible. As one of only two mental health trusts to receive a CQC rating of outstanding, the trust considered it a challenge to improve services further. They believe that the key to a successful future for the NHS is to share and spread the effectiveness of what they do and to learn from the successes of others. Consequently, the trust has formed a strategic partnership with NHS Improvement to support the development of a national model of improvement.

Innovative aspects of their workforce include: responsive and timely 24/7 urgent service in the community, street triage services in partnership with Northumbria Police, and the Blue room, which is an immersive virtual reality that helps autistic children overcome their phobias in Newcastle University.

Making interventional cardiology safer

University Hospitals of North Midlands NHS Trust

Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is the most commonly performed invasive procedure in patients with cardiovascular disease. While advances in technology and drug therapy means that these procedures retain an excellent safety record, major bleeding complications still account for one in eight deaths following PCI. Undertaking these procedures through the radial artery is safer and avoids the need for surgical intervention that is often required following major bleeding events.

The University Hospital North Midlands NHS Trust developed a programme to change national and international practice by analysing both national electronic healthcare data and economic data to demonstrate financial savings. They also provide national and international training programmes for clinicians, while focusing on the development of technique and equipment to improve the safety of complex procedures.

Mytherappy: tried and tested apps for recovery

Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust

Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust have developed a robust app-testing method to create an app database, hosted on a website that enables therapists to share high-quality and clinically-recommended apps, from trusted sources to meet patient demand and optimise stroke recovery.

The trust formed a testing group, a joint venture between staff and patients and explored how to incorporate the use of apps clinically. Thousands of apps were tested against a robust set of criteria and by the end of the project the group had developed a reliable database of apps that were proving to be effective.

The academic health science network and Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust agreed to jointly fund the website development to help share the findings. The MyTherappy app review website was co-produced with stakeholder consultation, and was successfully launched in October 2016.

The trust has received an incredibly positive response to MyTherappy from patients and professionals alike. Apps are being used across the stroke pathway at Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust, of which 93% of patients would recommend using. When comparing patients who used apps against those who didn’t over a six-month period, they found that those who used apps needed 40% fewer patient contacts within early support discharge.

The app service set up the pathway, testing criteria and funding practices that have expanded across the stroke and neurology pathways, and are now replicated in four other trusts. The Stroke Association credited the website as a tool which will “make a real difference”.  

New care model pilot: secure services in the south west

Devon Partnership NHS Trust

Devon Partnership NHS Trust is the Accountable Provider for a wave one pilot site in the tertiary mental health services new care models programme for Medium and Low Secure Services, which aims to bring patients closer to home to maintain better connections with their families and friends, and improve their interaction with local services. In partnership with eight local organisations, Devon Partnership has carried out a number of improvements to services.

The partnership has now successfully implemented a ‘repatriation plan’ developed with providers, patients and families to bring back patients who received care out of the area. All partners are signed up to one set of clinical outcomes which is enabling more appropriate, consistent assessments, ensuring patients receive the most appropriate care for their needs, and helping to reduce variations in care. A region-wide workforce approach is being developed with one set of learning and development requirements.

Being a wave one pilot site has enabled the team to learn from other new care model sites and share clinical and managerial expertise. The clinically-led model of care has transformed the way services are now being commissioned, with a more integrated and outcomes-based approach. With a more sustainable business model, the trust has been able to bring forward plans to invest in new step-down services.

Quality improvement within the surgical care group

The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospital NHS Foundation Trust have 17 operating theatres, staffed by 220 people, carrying out 26,000 operations in four different locations across the Bournemouth Hospital site. In 2015, the hospital faced challenges common to many trusts, such as the increased demand on services and a squeeze on funding. The trust received a CQC report which showed that quality and safety standards were not being met, which made staff morale low. In response to this, the trust implemented a quality improvement project in 2016-17, aiming to reduce lost theatre time to treat an additional 1,000 patients in 2016-17. 

A key feature of the project was the introduction of a ‘standard theatre day,’ whereby start and end times are agreed within built-in time, to enable professional flexibility. The trust was able to align the rosters of theatre staff with the job plans of surgeons, anaesthetists and the actual needs of theatres, at start up and close down. The trust changed its approach to staff recruitment and have improved the way it delivers training. A coordinator was introduced to ensure safe staffing levels and smooth running of lists; barriers to this were identified and mitigated against.

As a result, 1,354 more procedures were carried out in 2016-17 compared to the previous year, and referral to treatment times were above the national average for that year. Patients received quicker access to emergency surgery, reducing the length of stay for non-elective patients. The trust was able to release time for private patients, bringing income into the NHS without an increase in expenditure.

Importantly, staff survey results improved. The NHS 2016 staff survey ranked the trust, second out of all acute trusts in the country on how staff feel about the leadership and culture.

We can talk: mental health training for staff

Barts Health NHS Trust

Research shows children and young people have overwhelmingly negative experiences of presenting to hospitals, due to their mental health. Healthcare professionals working in hospital settings often report a lack of confidence and competency in caring for children with mental health needs. Barts Health NHS Trust endeavours to transform children and young people’s mental health, by providing training for their staff with the We can talk project, which is co-produced by Children and Young People’s Mental Health coalition. The project was co-produced with hospital staff, young people and mental health experts. More than 300 acute hospital staff working in Barts Health NHS Trust was engaged with young people and professionals, in developing a competency framework and training course.

This project was a collaborative effort; the training was co-delivered by mental health and hospital professionals, alongside a young advisor with experience of presenting to hospitals. The project ensued an increase in staff confidence when caring for children and young people with mental health issues.

SUPPORTER OPPORTUNITIES

Partnership packages

Our partnership packages offer you high profile, visibility and extensive involvement at our annual conference and exhibition. We also work with our partners throughout the year to actively support your offer to our members, extending the value of your event package.

Event partner

The highest level of support at the annual conference and exhibition enables you to engage with our audience through a variety of media, both at the event and throughout the year.

This headline opportunity is exclusive to three partners and is designed for organisations keen to build a strategic relationship with us and create a long-term engagement plan with our members.

This is a bespoke package and support can include:

  • top level branding as overall event partner
  • logo to feature on:
    • pre-event: all annual conference and exhibition communications including brochures and email campaigns
    • NEW: one pre-event blog on NHS Providers’ website, subject to NHS Providers approval
    • the event website with a hyperlink and maximum 50 word company description
    • on-site: the main plenary stage and on all event signage
    • post-event: post-event survey sent to all delegates
  • opportunity to deliver an hour-long session as part of the core conference programme
  • exhibition space adjacent to the NHS Providers’ stand
  • three delegate places for members of your team and three additional delegate places for NHS clients
  • access to the delegate list post event (subject to data protection regulations)
  • two top table places at the annual conference dinner
  • NEW: Private lounge area for client or internal meetings
  • opportunity to hold a one-hour session prior to one of the three NHS Providers chair and chief executives network meetings held each year
  • opportunity to hold a one-hour session prior to one of the NHS Providers other network meetings
  • access to NHS Providers electronic bulletins

£40,000 + VAT


Strand partner

Supporting a strand at our annual conference enables your organisation to be identified as a solutions provider around a key priority for the provider audience. We will engage with you throughout the year to support this and showcase wider areas of your work with the NHS.

This is a bespoke package but can include:

  • high level branding as strand partner
  • logo to feature on:
    • pre-event: logo on all annual conference and exhibition communications including brochures and email communications relating to the strand.
      New: inclusion of a maximum 50-word message to all attendees in the “session-booking” emails.
    • the event website with a hyperlink and maximum 50 word company description
    • on-site: all directional signage relating to the strand and two of your pull-up banners in the strand session rooms
    • post-event: post-event survey sent to all delegates
  • opportunity to chair a panel session that forms part of the strand.
  • two delegate places for members of your team
  • new: a delegate place for one of your NHS clients
  • new: opportunity to host a table at one of the lunchtime “market-place” sessions
  • opportunity to hold a one-hour session prior to one of our wider NHS Providers network meetings held annually.
  • access to NHS Providers electronic bulletins

£20,000 + VAT


New for 2017: breakfast session

We are offering the opportunity to deliver a thought leadership piece during breakfast on day two of the conference.

A maximum of two hour-long sessions will run at 8.00am.NHS Providers will actively market these sessions to our members and wider audience, provide you with regular updates on bookings and provide access to our policy team to help you shape your session so it has maximum impact on delegates.

The package includes:

  • an hour long breakfast session on day one of the conference
  • two full two-day conference passes
  • two one-day speaker passes
  • continental breakfast provided to session delegates
  • opportunity to invite six clients to attend the breakfast session
  • marketing support and regular updates on delegate attendance
  • branding on all signage related to the breakfast session

£8,500 + VAT

Exhibition

Does your organisation have a product, service, idea or solution that can help NHS provider organisations?

The issues facing the NHS are complex and it can be challenging to get time in front of NHS leaders – some of the hardest pressed public servants in the country.

Our exhibition offers your organisation the opportunity to:

  • meet NHS leaders and key decision-makers all together in one room
  • learn directly from those tasked with transforming the NHS and discover their priorities and how you can help them
  • network with delegates who are actively seeking solutions from the private sector
  • position your organisation as a market leader

Shell scheme

The package includes:

  • shell scheme stand structure
  • electrical package – two spotlights, one power socket
  • fascia nameboard on each open side
  • pre-event link from our website
  • exhibition briefing day
  • company listing on the event app
  • new: one full two-day delegate place
  • two delegate places at 50% discount
  • all lunches and refreshments at the event
  • carpet for your stand
  • 50-word entry on the event website

Aisle stand (open on side): £380 plus VAT per m2

Corner stand (open two sides): £395 plus VAT per m2

Space only

The package includes:

  • pre-event link from our website
  • exhibition briefing day
  • company listing on the event ap
  • new: one full two-day delegate place
  • two delegate places at a 50% discount
  • all lunches and refreshments at the event
  • carpet for your stand
  • 50-word entry on the event website

£370 + VAT per m2

Networking opportunities

Our delegates regularly tell us that networking is an essential part of the event and one that they value highly. Some of the best connections at events are not made in the conference session but informally at social events where our audience can share ideas in a more relaxed setting.

Our satellite events offer a great opportunity to get to know your audience and for them to make a connection with you.


Conference dinner

Held on site at the ICC, the conference dinner features an after dinner speaker and award-winning catering. Over 50% of delegates attend the NHS Providers annual conference dinner making it a highlight, not just of the event, but of the year. Support of the dinner not only increases your brand profile but offers you an opportunity to network with key leaders and influencers in the healthcare market.

The package includes:

  • high level branding
    • conference website
    • menu and dinner tickets
    • pop-up banners at the dinner
    • dinner signage
  • one piece of promotional material one each dinner table
  • two top table places
  • a table of 10 at the conference dinner
  • two full conference delegate places

£12,000 + VAT


Welcome reception

Our welcome reception for all delegates and exhibitors takes place at the end of day one. This is a great opportunity to increase your brand profile and to get a clear impactful message across to delegates.

The package includes:

  • a note of thanks from the chair of NHS Providers
  • two full conference delegate places
  • one top table dinner place
  • opportunity to display promotional material at the reception

£5,000 + VAT

Feature areas

Barista

A top quality event deserves top quality refreshment. Ever popular with both delegates and exhibitors, our barista area provides free barista quality teas, coffees and hot chocolate upon demand. This package offers you high visibility and includes:

  • branding throughout the barista area
  • two full conference delegate passes
  • one place at the annual conference dinner

£9,000 + VAT

Business centre with charge zone

As the pressure on the providers of healthcare service increases, so does the necessity to keep in touch whilst away at conference. The business centre provides delegates with work desks, a printer and the facility to recharge their phones, tablets and laptops giving them the tools to respond to issues back at base when they need to.

  • logo on all banners and signage relating to the business centre
  • two full conference delegate passes
  • one place at the conference dinner
  • exclusive opportunity to distribute literature within the business centre

£6,000 + VAT

Provider showcase

Our provider showcase will enable 12 of our members to demonstrate good practice and new innovations to their peers to help improve how services are delivered across the country. It is an important way for our members to learn from each and is a much valued feature at our event.

This package includes:

  • logo on all showcase banners and signage
  • two full conference delegate places
  • one place at the annual conference dinner

£9,000 + VAT

Registration

Ensure your brand is in front of our delegates from the very start of their conference experience. Supporting the registration area gives you immediate visibility.

This package includes:

  • branding on registration signage
  • leaflet racks available for your literature in the registration area
  • two full conference delegate places

£4,500 + VAT

Branding

Delegate badges and lanyards

With delegate, exhibitor and speaker networking forming an integral part of the experience, your logo will be seen and noticed by delegates throughout the event.

This package includes:

  • logo on all delegate badges and lanyards
  • two full conference delegate places

£7,500 + VAT

Delegate bags

Each delegate will be handed a bag upon arrival and will use them throughout the event. Often our bags continue to be used long after the event closes, extending the package value beyond the conference.

This package includes:

  • your logo on all delegate bags
  • two full conference delegate places

£5,000 + VAT

App

Delegates will interact with the event in the build up to the event and on site with access to personalised schedules and online networking.

  • Headline branding on the app
  • Two places at the conference dinner

£9,000 + VAT

Book your place

Online bookings are now closed

We have frozen our rates at 2016 prices. We have special rates for providers, and
group discounts of up to 25% are also available, please see below.

NHS Providers members

Number of delegates Discount Full conference  Single day 
1   £429  £299 
2 5%  £815.10  £568.10 
10%  £1158.30  £807.30 
4 15% £1458.60 £1016.60
5 20% £1716 £1196.00
6 or more 25% £321.75 per delegate £224.25

 

Non-members and commercial organisations

    Non-member (NHS or charity)   Commercial organisation  
Number of delegates Discount Full conference Single day Full conference Single day
1   £649 £449 £889 £629
2 5% £1223.10 £853.10 £1708.10 £1195.10
3 10% £1752.30 £1212.30 £2427.30 £1698.30
4 15% £2206.60 £1526.60 £3056.60 £2138.60
5 20% £2596.00 £1796.00 £3596.00 £2516.00
6 or more 25%

£478.75 per delegate

£336.75 per delegate £674.25 per delegate £471.75 per delegate

Conference dinner

The conference dinner will be held on 7 November. Attendees can continue to explore the conference themes in a more informal environment and hear from an after dinner speaker.

Limited spaces are available and booking your dinner place in advance is recommended to avoid disappointment.

Conference dinner rates are as follows:

NHS Providers member £50
Non-member - NHS or charity £75
Commercial organisation £100

Terms and conditions

Booking terms and conditions

Discounts and Payments

  • Group discount applies to conference places only and not dinner places. 
  • A mixture of one-day and full conference bookings can be made, however discounts will be applied separately to the multiples of one-day and full conference tickets.
  • A mixture of delegate categories within a group (e.g. member and non-member tickets) is not possible, they must be booked separately.
  • Invoices must be settled within 30 days and at least two weeks before the event, or admission may be refused. If payment has not been made in advance for the event, please ensure you have a credit/debit card with you, so that payment can be taken at registration.
  • Invoices can be paid via credit/debit cards or BACS by invoice (a PO number is mandatory when booking).
  • Please note that payment by invoice will not be available after 7 October and all bookings will need to be paid by credit/debit card.

Cancellation Policy (delegate conference and dinner places)

  • 90 - 60 days prior to the conference start 
    25% of the value of the delegate/dinner place(s) cancelled is non - refundable
  • 60 - 30 days prior to the conference start 
    50% of the value of the delegate/dinner place(s) cancelled is non - refundable
  • 0 - 30 days prior to the conference start 
    100% of the value of the delegate/dinner place(s) cancelled is non - refundable

If a cancellation is made within a group booking, the discount for the remaining members will also be re-calculated. Any refunds will be paid via the original payment method.

These charges cover the administration costs that we incur on cancellation.

Cancellations can be completed via the booking website or via email: events@nhsproviders.org 

Refunds will be processed after online booking for the event has closed.

Delegate information

  • Registration details and a map will be sent two weeks before the event.
  • All changes to delegate name, job title and organisation must be made two weeks prior to the event. Unless you specify when booking, you will be added to the delegate list that will be circulated to conference delegates and exhibitors. Subsequent to this, changes will not be reflected in the delegate list. 
  • Amendments to delegate information can be made at the registration desk at the event.
  • Delegate substitutions are possible and can be made through the booking website or by email.
  • Due to limited spaces, priority will be given to NHS Providers members.
  • There may be a photographer at the event and photographs of delegates may be used on future marketing materials. If you do not want your photograph to be taken or used in this way, please notify a member of staff on-site.
  • Programme details are correct at the time of going to press. We reserve the right to make changes where necessary.

 Data protection

  • We will include your personal details on the delegate list which is given to delegates, sponsors and exhibitors. The delegate list includes name, job title and company information but not contact details. Please let us know if you would like us to exclude your contact details from this delegate list.
  • We do have some sponsorship packages that would potentially allow our sponsors to have access to your email address, although for any one event, this will not be more than three partners and they will only be allowed to make reasonable use of the data they receive.
  • If you wish to opt-out of your contact details being passed onto these partners, please email events@nhsproviders.org.
  • Your badge will have a bar code on it which can be scanned by exhibitors to capture your personal information, such as your name, job title, organisation and email address. Please inform the exhibitor at the time if you do not wish to have your details scanned or used.

Venue and accommodation

Our annual conference and exhibition took place on 7-8 November 2017 at the ICC in Birmingham.

The International Convention Centre
Broad Street
Birmingham
B1 2EA

Approximately 10 minutes walk from Birmingham New Street rail station and with plenty of car parking nearby, the ICC is easily accessible. You can view further location and direction details on the venue’s website.

Accommodation
Birmingham ICC’s city centre location offers an abundance of accommodation options close to the venue. Reservation Highway negotiated specially discounted rates for our conference delegates.

Contact us

If you have any queries about our annual conference, please contact a member of the team or complete the contact form below and we'll be in touch shortly.